Posts Tagged

iCloud

Apple ships iCloud folder sharing, iPad trackpad support – and more

Apple has updated iPhones, iPads, Macs and the Apple Watch/Apple TV, offering up  some of the features we’ve been talking about for weeks, including iCloud folder sharing, iPad trackpad support and more

The productivity update

You could argue that the update is a boost to productivity, particularly as it includes support for features that should be quite useful to remote workers – namely iCloud Folder Sharing and trackpad support for iPads.

It’s an important update that introduces a string of essential improvements:

  • iCloud folder sharing.
  • Mouse and trackpad support for iPads.
  • Universal app purchases.
  • Toolbar improvements in Mail.
  • Keyboard shortcuts for Photos.
  • New CarPlay controls.

You also get support for the recently introduced Beats Powerbeats 4 earphones and a selection of nine new Memoji stickers.

Mac users gain Screen Time Communication Limits (useful for remote workers  attempting to keep life under control) and real-time Apple Music lyrics. And recently played Apple Arcade games now appear in the Arcade tab, making it much easier to play them across all your Apple devices.

What is iCloud folder sharing?

Without a doubt the marquee feature in this release, iCloud Folder Sharing means you can share entire folders of documents, images and other digital stuff with others. Simple to use, the feature was originally announced at WWDC 2019. (Apple may have had problems ensuring consistent behavior in the feature, which turns iCloud Drive into a Dropbox replacement for the rest of us.)

What is mouse and trackpad support for iPads?

I wrote a whole article about this feature; essentially trackpad support means your iPad becomes an even more effective (and far more use flexible) MacBook replacement. It gives you a new cursor design that highlights app icons on the Home Screen and Dock and buttons and controls in apps.

What are Universal app purchases?

Remember the old days when you had to purchase an app for iOS and an app for Mac using two separate App Stores? You still do, but now you (may) only need to pay once for the privilege, as Universal App Purchases let developers make both apps available for one price exchange.

What is the new Mail toolbar?

The new Mail toolbar is a big improvement to a little problem. People complained that the delete and reply to controls were too close together in iOS 13, which led them to accidentally delete mails they wanted to keep.

The update puts a little space between the two and adds new Folder and Compose buttons. Enterprise users will want to know that responses to encrypted emails are automatically encrypted when you have configured S/MIME for this.

What are the new CarPlay controls?

You now get support for third-party navigation apps and call controls on the dashboard when on a call via the Phone app or any (compatible) VoIP app that supports CarPlay.

Is there anything else?

You mean beyond the customary list of patched problems? Of course. You’ll find a new Shazam It Shortcut you can use to identify a song that’s playing, some new keyboard shortcuts if you happen to be using Photos and audio playback for USDZ files.

What about Apple Watch?

Apple also updated Apple Watch to watchOS 6.2. This offers support for in-app purchases on the device and brings ECG support to Chile, New Zealand and Turkey. The company also introduced tvOS 13.4, which improves Family Sharing.

You can read Apple’s notes on the iOS/iPadOS update here.

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

Apple ships iCloud folder sharing, iPad trackpad support, more

Apple has updated iPhones, iPads, Macs and the Apple Watch/Apple TV, introducing some of the features we’ve been talking about for weeks, including iCloud folder sharing, iPad trackpad support, and more

The productivity update

You could argue that the update is a boost to productivity, particularly as it includes support for features that should be quite useful to remote workers, namely iCloud Folder Sharing and trackpad support for iPads.

It’s an important update that introduces a string of essential improvements:

  • iCloud folder sharing.
  • Mouse and trackpad support for iPads.
  • Universal app purchases.
  • Toolbar improvements in Mail.
  • Keyboard shortcuts for Photos.
  • New CarPlay controls.

You also get support for the recently introduced Beats Powerbeats 4 earphones and a selection of nine new Memoji stickers.

Mac users gain Screen Time Communication Limits (so useful for the remote worker attempting to keep life under control) and real-time Apple Music lyrics.

Recently played Apple Arcade games now appear in the Arcade tab, making it much easier to play them across all your Apple devices.

What is iCloud folder sharing?

Without doubt the marquee feature in this release, iCloud Folder Sharing means you can share entire folders of documents, images and other digital stuff with others. Simple to use, Apple may have had problems ensuring consistent behavior in the feature, which turns iCloud Drive into a Dropbox replacement for the rest of us.

The feature was originally announced at WWDC 2019.

What is mouse and trackpad support for iPads?

I wrote a whole article about this, but essentially trackpad support means your iPad becomes an even more effective (and far more use flexible) MacBook replacement. It gives you a new cursor design that highlights app icons on the Home Screen and Dock and buttons and controls in apps. Take a look.

What are Universal app purchases?

Remember the old days when you had to purchase an app for iOS and an application for Mac on two separate App Stores? You still do, but now you (may) only need to pay once for the privilege, as Universal App Purchases let developers make both apps available for one price exchange.

What is the new Mail toolbar?

The new Mail toolbar is a big improvement to a little problem. People complained that the delete and reply to controls were too close together in iOS 13, which led them to accidentally delete mails they wanted to keep.

The update puts a little space between the two and adds new Folder and Compose buttons. Enterprise users will want to know of that responses to encrypted emails are automatically encrypted when you have configured S/MIME for this.

What are the new CarPlay controls?

You now get support for third-party navigation apps and call controls on the dashboard when on a call via the Phone app or any (compatible) VoIP app that supports CarPlay.

Is there anything else?

You mean beyond the customary list of patched problems? Of course. You’ll find a new Shazam It Shortcut you can use to identify a song that’s playing, some new keyboard shortcuts if you happen to be using Photos and audio playback for USDZ files.

What about Apple Watch?

Apple has also updated Apple Watch to watchOS 6.2.  This offers support for in-app purchases on the device and bring ECG support to Chile, New Zealand, and Turkey. The company also introduced tvOS 13.4, which improves Family Sharing.

You can read Apple’s notes on the iOS/iPadOS update here.

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

Is Apple’s iCloud folder sharing a shadow IT problem?

After a long delay, Apple is preparing to introduce iCloud Folder Sharing across both its Mac and iOS platforms. This is a big blessing for collaboration, but is it safe?

What is iCloud Folder Sharing?

iCloud Folder Sharing was first announced at WWDC 2019, but delayed until – well, at present it is still delayed and was only recently made available inside the latest iOS and macOS developer betas. Which means it should be on the way.

Probably.

How it works?

It works in a similar way to iCloud file sharing, except you can define shared folders as well as shared files.

In use, you can choose to make it possible to share a folder with anyone who has a specific link or choose to limit access solely to named parties. You also get to choose if people you share items with can edit them, or just take a look.

It is reasonable to assume these items/folders will also be available to those using iCloud for Windows. Mobile device support on other platforms was also recently improved.

A little bit.

In theory, iCloud Folder Sharing means Apple now offers a relatively cross-platform tool with which teams can share and collaborate on projects – though it isn’t as smooth, feature-rich or as cross platform compatible as Dropbox or Box.

Your company already uses iCloud

The thing is, with tens of millions of iPhone and Mac users in place across the enterprise market, it seems pretty clear that most of your employees are likely already using iCloud.

The new feature just makes it more likely they’ll use it more, including to collaborate on projects. After all, one of the huge benefits of the service is that it’s as easy to use as anything else Apple does – and ease-of-use is one of the big drivers for Shadow IT.

 And that is where iCloud may become a bigger problem for enterprise security chiefs trying to handle the challenge of unauthorized use of apps by their mobile employees.

iCloud and encryption

It is of course true to say that iCloud is a relatively secure system.

Not only are Macs and iOS devices way more secure than any other platform (though no platform is perfect), but iCloud’s two-factor authentication (2FA), deep platform integration, and the nature of the encryption that protects information as it is transmitted to and from the service all provide good protection.

The problem with iCloud is (and always is) the user:

While it is possible to protect your iCloud with complex alpha-numeric passcodes, most people just don’t. Indeed, I can recall reading a recent report that claims around a third of iCloud users still haven’t enabled 2FA on their systems.

That’s up to them, I guess, but when a highly secure iCloud user with complex passcodes and 2FA enabled chooses to share highly confidential enterprise-related documents inside a folder with another user, how are they to know how well secured that other user’s iCloud access actually is?

They don’t.

And this is a problem enterprise security teams will need to address pretty quickly now we know iCloud Folder Sharing is coming.

Update enterprise security policy today

I’m certain some enterprises may ban use of iCloud, just as many already attempt ban use of any consumer-grade cloud-based document services, but I don’t think bans work – they just create a blame culture in which employees become reluctant to seek help when things go wrong.

It seems much more sensible to assume these things will be used, and take steps to manage such use, than to issue terse memos banning use of services you as the head of department are probably also making use of yourself.

What does work is policy.

In this case, it seems sensible for enterprise security chiefs to advise employees who choose to use iCloud for work to protect their account with complex alphanumeric passcodes.

That’s not the only protection that needs to be put in place.

Employees must be encouraged to use 2FA and to keep their devices up-to-date (unless controlled by you with an MDM solution.

This is why. Apple’s iCloud security pages tell us:

“iCloud secures your information by encrypting it when it’s in transit, storing it in iCloud in an encrypted format, and using secure tokens for authentication. For certain sensitive information, Apple uses end-to-end encryption. This means that only you can access your information, and only on devices where you’re signed into iCloud. No one else, not even Apple, can access end-to-end encrypted information.”

Thing is, and this is important, in order for end-to-end encryption to work it is necessary that two-factor authentication is turned on for the Apple ID.

The difference between how Apple protects your information in iCloud and on your device is encryption. iCloud Drive data is protected by “a minimum of 128-bit AES encryption,” according to Apple.

That’s quite strong I suppose, but may not be as secure as what you define in your security policy – and it is important to note that data stored in the drive is not protected by end-to-end encryption while there, though it is encrypted in transit.

If you want data to be kept securely in your or your employee’s drives, it makes sense to encrypt that information before uploading it.

While this adds friction to the sharing/collaboration process it also means your enterprise’s confidential data (or your personal info) has better protection.

(I’ll be looking at good encryption solutions for this task in the next few weeks, so do follow me on social media to learn what I find out.)

You can also deploy MDM solutions to control iCloud and data access across your network. Though the best protection will always be to offer approved secure collaboration spaces that are as easy-to-use as iCloud or any other consumer service.

Final thoughts

Even with all the protection in place – policy, approved collaboration tools, even edge device security, the inconvenient truth is that data will slip, employees with poorly-protected consumer services such as iCloud will use those services, and security problems will emerge.

That’s why it’s so important to ensure everyone at your organization feels sufficiently safeguarded that in the event something does go wrong they’ll not waste time before letting IT security know a problem exists. Because not knowing a problem exists is usually a bigger problem than the problem itself.

Summing up: Employees will use iCloud Drive, they already do and now they’ll use it to collaborate on some tasks. They should be encouraged to:

  • Use 2FA.
  • Use complex alphanumeric passcodes.
  • Keep software up to date.
  • Confirm people they share data with are equally security conscious.
  • Should encrypt data before uploading to the service.
  • Should have some way to ask for help if things go wrong.

I’ll be interested to hear any other good advice on this matter.

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

How to Set Up iCloud Email Access on Android

The "Connect iCloud" sign-in form on an Android smartphone.
Ben Stockton

If you switch from iPhone to Android, you don’t have to ditch iCloud services, like iCloud Mail. While Apple doesn’t make it easy to set up, it is possible to sign in and use your iCloud email address on Android.

While we recommend Gmail, you should be able to add your iCloud email address in most email apps.

Create an App-Specific Password for iCloud

Before you begin, you need to configure your iCloud account. Apple’s two-factor authentication normally makes it difficult for third-party apps to sign in, but Apple lets you generate a separate “app-specific password” to use on Android.

First, sign in to your Apple account and scroll to the “Security” section. Under “App-specific passwords,” click “Generate password.”

Click "Generate Password."

If you don’t see this section, you have to set up two-factor authentication on your Apple account. You need a recent Mac, iPhone, or iPad to do this.

RELATED: How to Set Up Two-Factor Authentication for Your Apple ID

Provide a brief but memorable description for this password (for example, “Android sign-in”), and then click “Create.”

The "Enter a Password Label" box in the "Generate Password" section.

Save the password Apple generates for you; you’ll need to use this instead of your Apple ID password to complete the login process.

Set up iCloud Email Access for Gmail

With your separate app password set up, you’re ready to sync your iCloud emails with Gmail—the default email app for most people who own Android devices. Remember, this process should also work in other email clients, though; we cover more about that below.

To start, swipe down from the top of your device to access the notifications shade, and then tap the gear icon. Alternatively, you can access the Android settings from your apps drawer.

The Android notifications shade.

In the main settings menu, tap “Accounts.” Depending on your device and the version of Android it runs, this might have a slightly different name, like “Accounts and Backup.”

Tap "Accounts and Backup"

If you’re using a Samsung device, tap “Accounts” again in the next menu. For other Android devices, you should be able to skip this step.

Tap "Accounts" on a Samsung device.

You see a list of the accounts synced with your device. Scroll to the bottom and tap “Add account.”

Tap "Add Account."

Select “Personal (IMAP)” with the Gmail symbol next to it.

Tap "Personal IMAP."

The Gmail sign-in screen appears. Type your iCloud email address, and then tap “Next.”

The Gmail sign-in screen.

Type in the password Apple generated for you (not your Apple ID password), and then Tap “Next.”

Type your password, and then tap "Next."

If your email address and password are correct, Android (via Gmail) signs in and starts to sync your iCloud email account to your device. You might have to confirm some additional settings, like how often you want Gmail to sync your emails.

To see if the process worked, launch the Gmail app, and then tap the menu button in the top-left. You should see your iCloud email account alongside your others; tap it to switch to it in Gmail.

You can now use your iCloud email address to send and receive emails.

Use Microsoft Outlook or Other Email Apps

You don’t have to use the Gmail app to get your iCloud emails on Android. There are other alternatives, like Microsoft Outlook. The setup process is similar, no matter which app you choose.

In the Outlook app, for example, tap the hamburger menu, and then tap the add account icon (the envelope with the plus sign in the corner).

Tap the add account button.

Here, type your iCloud email address, and then tap “Continue.”

The "Add Account" pane in the Outlook app.

Outlook automatically detects you’re signing in with an iCloud account, so you shouldn’t have to do anything else. Type your password, and then tap the check mark at the top right to sign in.

Type your iCloud password, and then tap the check mark.

You should now be able to view and send emails from your iCloud email address.

If you want to use another email app, look for the IMAP sign-in option when you sign in to your account or the iCloud option. Use your generated password to complete the sign-in process, and you should be able to use your iCloud email as if you were on an iOS or Mac device.





Source link

Your guide to using iCloud in business

Use of iOS across the enterprise is increasing. Tight integration between iPhones, iOS and iCloud present an opportunity to exploit Apple’s online device and data backup service. Spiceworks claims 7 percent of enterprise software budgets will be spent on backup and recovery in 2019.

FAO Schwarz recently moved to deploy Apple solutions across its business; SKF, the world’s largest producers of bearings and seals has cut production errors to zero as a result of moving its manufacturing processes to iOS and SAP. John Hopkins Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Stanford Health Care and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are all deploying around iOS.

Egnyte claims various models of iPad and iPhone account for the entire top 10 most used mobile solutions, in terms of actual activity.

Apple’s service can become a useful component for any enterprise attempting to mitigate shadow IT. We know employees will use unapproved software if it’s easier or more accessible than sanctioned enterprise solutions, so why not find ways to use the secure software they probably already have.

How iCloud can help

While there are exceptions, enterprise security policies typically avoid the use of public document and data storage and sharing services. Challenges around server location, data protection and local data regulation mean public services aren’t always the best choice for confidential enterprise data.

While Apple doesn’t present iCloud as an enterprise-focused product, the highly secure service does provide a range of useful tools for enterprise pros.

The company also continues to make its platforms more enterprise friendly, including addition of new iCloud features for enterprises, not least data separation and enterprise iCloud.

However, with Apple occupying an ever-larger space in enterprise IT, perhaps enterprises should think about how its highly secure platforms can be used to supplement existing workflows.

Ease of use remains an advantage 

Apple’s universal advantage remains ease-of-use. For example, onboarding: A new

 

U.S. smartphone ownership has doubled since 2011.  Today, 95 percent of employees use mobile devices while at work and they demand that enterprise systems are as easy to use as the apps they use on their phones. If they are not, they just won’t use them.

iCloud enters the enterprise

Use of iOS across the enterprise is increasing. Tight integration between iPhones, iOS and iCloud present an opportunity to exploit Apple’s online device and data backup service. Spiceworks claims 7 percent of enterprise software budgets will be spent on backup and recovery in 2019.

Related: Is this iCloud for the enterprise?

FAO Schwarz recently moved to deploy Apple solutions across its business; SKF, the world’s largest producers of bearings and seals has cut production errors to zero as a result of moving its manufacturing processes to iOS and SAP. John Hopkins Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Stanford Health Care and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are all deploying around iOS.

Egnyte claims various models of iPad and iPhone account for the entire top 10 most used mobile solutions, in terms of actual activity.

Apple’s service can become a useful component for any enterprise attempting to mitigate shadow IT. We know employees will use unapproved software if it’s easier or more accessible than sanctioned enterprise solutions, so why not find ways to use the secure software they probably already have.

How iCloud can help

While there are exceptions, enterprise security policies typically avoid the use of public document and data storage and sharing services. Challenges around server location, data protection and local data regulation mean public services aren’t always the best choice for confidential enterprise data.

While Apple doesn’t present iCloud as an enterprise-focused product, the highly secure service does provide a range of useful tools for enterprise pros.

Related: Q&A: How CIOs Can Benefit from Apple iOS 5, iCloud

The company also continues to make its platforms more enterprise friendly, including addition of new iCloud features for enterprises, not least data separation and enterprise iCloud.

However, with Apple occupying an ever-larger space in enterprise IT, perhaps enterprises should think about how its highly secure platforms can be used to supplement existing workflows.

Ease of use remains an advantage

 Apple’s universal advantage remains ease-of-use. For example, onboarding: A new employee authorized to store files, mail and data on an iCloud account (including those using an enterprise mail address) can deploy a new Mac, iPhone or iPad in minutes by just signing the new device into their Apple ID. When they do, they’ll see the entire contents of the iCloud Drive, passwords in Keychain, Calendar and other assets automatically download to their device. They will also find third-party email addresses automatically populated to their mail account, though they will need to enter passwords.

iOS supports Entourage, and with Microsoft Office 365 apps also available to the platform, it’s possible for iCloud to become a component that enables fast deployment of new employees on Apple platforms.

In 2018, SAP vice president of IT services, enterprise mobility, Martin Lang, showed how a new employee could be onboarded within five minutes using iOS and MDM support from Jamf.

Apple provides tools to enable automatic device enrollment in your mobile device management (MDM) solution. Apple Business Manager is accessible on the web and is designed for technology managers and IT administrators.

How secure is iCloud?

The company says it strives to ensure it does not become a custodian of personal data. It collects only the essential data it needs to provide the service. Users can access this data, but no one else can in the absence of an Apple ID.

You can store most digital content on iCloud Drive: Files, folders, documents, images, spreadsheets, tables and more. For the most part, if you can put it on a Mac, you can store it in the iCloud Drive.

The integration between service and device is such that an end user will be able to interact with most files without being aware that encryption is applied. Apple makes heavy use of encryption across the iCloud data journey, to the extent that information stored on its servers remains protected by the original user’s hash/security keys and 128-bit AES encryption.

You can read more about iOS security in Apple’s white paper, though — like any other secure technology — Apple’s is only as secure as the passwords and security practices of end users.

As a quick reminder, IT leaders should encourage employees to use alphanumeric passcodes, enable two-factor authentication and ensure security practices are followed at all times. An open culture of internal security incident disclosure helps – if an employee gets hacked that’s a bad thing: if they don’t tell you it happened, it’s likely to be a disaster.

What iCloud services are available?

There are numerous specific services that use iCloud to sync, though the actual list of services that rely on Apple’s servers is much wider as this page shows.

The following are some of the services offered by iCloud that may be of use to enterprise workers:

  • iCloud Drive: Digital files and assets
  • Mail: iCloud email addresses, Mail app also works with other email providers through a concise setup interface.
  • Safari: Bookmark sync is useful, but Safari’s ability to share Safari tabs across all the devices logged into an Apple ID is of huge benefit to researchers.
  • iCloud keychain: Keychain is an important and highly secure element to Apple’s OS stack. It is a highly secure space in which passwords for accounts and services can be kept. iCloud Keychain enables users to easily and securely use complex passcodes across services and all their devices.
  • Find My: Apple will compound two services: Find My Friends and Find My Phone into the new Find My service, which uses low energy Bluetooth to enable users to find lost equipment, including Macs.
  • Contacts, Calendars, Reminders: With Siri support and integration across Apple’s stack, the PIN apps can be useful, though perhaps lacking for professional use. Apple’s upcoming Mac and iOS upgrades will integrate with Siri on your device, enabling users to quickly and securely set reminders in response to communications that take place on that device.
  • Notes: A useful addition. It’s possible to collaborate with other users on Notes, making these quite a useful place for brainstorming and casual requests. The facility to scan documents and share with other applications may also come in useful for iOS users.

iCloud system preferences/settings

 You set which apps and services sync through your iCloud account in System Preferences (Mac) or Settings (iOS). Here you can enable and disable the apps that sync through the service, including those apps that use iCloud Drive. Enterprise workers will likely check the Desktops and Documents folder, as this will sync data held in both to all their devices.

iCloud’s Files app: A secure Dropbox for Apple devices

Apple’s mobile devices use the Files app as a file manager. This already stores documents, images and other digital assets in a secure environment that can be accessed using any Apple device that’s logged into the relevant Apple ID.

Files already works with and syncs iCloud Drive, and is compatible with third-party online storage services, including those from Dropbox, Box, OneDrive, Google Drive, SugarSync, Amazon Drive and others. Developers can make use of Apple’s CloudKit APIs to build online sync and storage into apps.

Files in iOS 13 will also be able to access files from external storage devices like SD cards, USB flash drives and SMB network drives. It will also introduce enhanced collaboration features: at present it is possible to collaborate on individual files, but iOS 13 will introduce shared folders in Files.

This integration means employees can interact with items stored on multiple file services within one app and drag & drop them between storage locations.

Anecdotally, this means iOS users get virtually real-time access to files they keep on online services – and in many cases sync is faster and more efficient.

Similar to most browser-based online storage solutions, users can also access all the files they have stored in iCloud Drive through a browser at www.icloud.com.

How to collaborate on an item stored in iCloud Drive:

  • Select it.
  • Tap the Share
  • Choose Add People from the lowest row of options.
  • Set who can access the item: Only people you invite or anyone with a link.
  • Set permissions: Can make changes or View only.
  • Choose how you wish to send the invitation to collaborate on the item.
  • Choose the person(so) you hope to share with.
  • They will be provided with a link they can use to collaborate/review.

Apple’s iOS 13 brings big enterprise improvements

Apple this fall will ship iOS 13. This will make iOS – and iCloud – much more useful within enterprise deployments. One focus is data separation, enabling enterprises to protect their own data while also protecting employee privacy.

  1. Managed Apple IDs improve in iOS 13: Managed Apple IDs for business are improved in iOS 13. Available to enterprises in countries supported by Apple Business Manager, these make it possible to assign separate work-related Apple IDs to employees.
  2. Single Sign-on Extension: The new Single Sign-on Extension is designed so enterprise app developers can deploy corporate ID solutions from the likes of Okta or Azure. (The much-discussed Sign-in with Apple solution isn’t intended as an enterprise product, the company has said).

Data separation for BYOD

Apple will also introduce data separation for BYOD programs in iOS 13. This consists of new User Enrollment tools that enable IT to deploy enterprise Apple IDs on employee devices to control enterprise apps and data while leaving employee data untouched.

Apps can either be unmanaged or managed, with the exception of Mail and Notes. Managed apps installed by a business will be controlled by IT while unmanaged apps (including Photos and so on) remain the domain of the user, and their personal Apple ID.

If a Note is created in a managed Apple ID it will be controlled, but if created in a personal account it will not be. The result is that it becomes possible to separate corporate from personal information and delete data once an employee leaves the firm without breaking an employee’s data – or monitoring an employee’s private life.

The end result?

It will be possible for enterprises to give employees two iCloud Drives: one will be a highly secure environment for personal data; the other a highly secure and also managed environment for enterprise data, which can be remotely managed through Apple Business Manager.

iCloud proves to be a viable enterprise addition

Apple’s growing market share and high degree of platform and online security makes iCloud a viable addition to an enterprise toolkit.

Related: Data shows time is right for ‘iCloud: Enterprise edition’

The ability to separate employee from corporate data on a single device, and to remotely manage permissions, deployment and new device setup through Apple Business Manager and third party MDM solutions provides a good starting point for wider enterprise use of iCloud.

However, data regulation and the need to satisfy sometimes complex data protection and data journey law means in more heavily regulated industries, iCloud becomes a useful addition to proprietary core services, rather than a replacement.

What are the system requirements for iCloud? 

iCloud requires a Mac running at least Yosemite and iOS devices running at least iOS 8. You can also access the service online through a compliant web browser and on Windows using the free iCloud for Windows app. The latter provides users with access to iCloud Drive and data sync from their devices. iCloud does not support Android.

Need a little more help?

Apple hosts its own extensive selection of resources to support MDM and device management here.

Numerous companies will guide enterprises in the deployment of Apple kit within existing infrastructure: Jamf, MobileIron, VMWare, SOTI, Cisco, BlackBerry, Accenture, SAP, Salesforce, IBM, GE and many others all offer various forms of support.



Source link