"> January Archives - Engr Kabir Saleh

Posts Tagged

January

Popular design news of the week: January 6, 2020 – January 12, 2020

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

 

Design Trends 2020: Outside the Box

 

What are the 10 UX Trends for 2020?

 

Flat UI and a Half

 

Designers React to the New PS5 Logo (and it’s not Pretty)

 

This Website Lets You Name a HEX Code

 

Notably – Create Markdown Content, Code Snippets and Text Notes

 

New Logo and Identity for Fisher-Price by Pentagram

 

2019: Projects of the Year

 

Design Resolutions

 

Figma’s Features for the Entire Design Process

 

Instagram Font Generator

 

The Next Decade of Design will Be About Fixing the Last Century of Excess

 

Using the “Flywheel Effect” in Product Design

 

Neumorphism will not Kill the Skeuomorphism Star

 

Toyota’s Creepy New ‘Prototype Town’ is a Real-life Westworld

 

The End of “Someone”

 

Fritch – Free Vintage Typeface

 

The Split Personality of Brutalist Web Development

 

All Design Conferences

 

Anatomy of a Logo: The Star Wars Logo Evolution

 

6 Category Page Design Examples

 

Color Stuck? Try the Color Palette Finding Technique Graphic Designers Love

 

7 UI Trends to Watch in 2020

 

Here’s the Typography of the Next Decade

 

Designers Need to Get Paid. Let’s Ban ‘Exposure’ Once and for all

 

Want more? No problem! Keep track of top design news from around the web with Webdesigner News.



Source link

Exciting New Tools for Designers, January 2020

We typically start the month with a roundup of new tools and resources for designers, but with the start of a new year (and new decade), we thought a roundup of things to help you get more organized would be appropriate.

Some of these tools have been around for a while with features you might not be using. Other tools are on the new side and offer great functionality. How many of these tools are part of your kit? Which ones will you resolve to use this year?

Here’s what you need to get organized this month and start 2020 off right.

 

Dropbox

Dropbox is one tool that’s hard to live without. Not only can you use it to manage files and share, you can also use it to run presentations directly with Zoom conferencing or in Slack. Free plans are enough to get started and upgraded plans provide greater storage capability for individuals or teams.

Working from multiple locations with desktop sync and sharing client files are features that make this tool something I use every day.

Feature you need to be using: Shared link expiration dates. When you share files via link, set an expiration date to ensure files aren’t hanging out with access indefinitely.

dropbox

 

Slack

Slack is probably a tool that you are already using, but are you making the most of it? Channels, hashtags, and integrations are the key to ensuring that Slack works for you in the way you need it. Take the time to set these up for an efficient, and organized, workflow across multiple teams.

Feature you need to be using: Sync Slack and your Google Calendar for real-time away statuses that work for you.

 

Cloud Libraries

We all work from a variety of locations—home, work, on desktops and laptops—so cloud-based libraries are a must. Save common files in a location that you can access from anywhere.

Feature you need to be using: Adobe Creative Cloud comes with a place to save libraries, but you can save and connect library files from any cloud-based tool.

 

Trello

Trello is a free organization and collaboration tool for just about any project. Think of it as a giant project checklist that allows you (or other team members) to keep an eye on how anything from a website build to planning a trip. It works cross devices and isn’t hard to figure out.

Feature you need to be using: Workflow automatons with due date commands and rule-based triggers to make tedious processes happen on their own.

 

Google Keep

Google Keep is the notetaking app you always wanted. Take notes from any device—sync across all devices—and share or keep notes to yourself. You can take notes by typing, with photos or audio (and it will transcribe messages for you). The best part is this notes app is free and pretty much makes anything else you are using obsolete.

Feature you need to be using: Location, and time-based reminders help keep you on task just when you need it.

 

Grammarly

Grammarly saves time and effort by checking your messages, everything from documents to website content to emails or social media posts, as you type. Use it to avoid embarrassing mistakes in your writing.

Feature you need to be using: Emojis help you track the tone of your message so that it’s on point and audience-appropriate.

 

ClickUp

ClickUp takes all your other apps and merges them into a single location and dashboard for easy organization. You can use it to manage your own workspace (free) or collaborate with teams (paid plan). There are multiple views—I’m a big fan of the list option—and templates help jumpstart using the tool.

Feature you need to be using: Use the messages option to create tasks or comments. Boom!

 

Filing System

Nothing beats a solid filing system. The key benefit of a system is that you store files and folders in the same way every time, making it easier to find things later.

I keep folders first by year. Within annual folders are folders by client name. Then by project name. When projects are complete, I end up with two folders: WORKING and FINAL. Use the same format for naming files. (I use Client Name-Project-Year.)

Feature you need to be using: Date project files. Relying on “date modified” settings isn’t enough if you resave an old file by mistake.

 

Invoicely

Invoicely makes it easy to work as a freelance designer. The platform is made for sending invoices, managing clients, and allows you to accept online payments. It’s secure and offers a free plan (as well as a paid option).

Feature you need to be using: If you are trying to get organized, time tracking tools help you know just what an individual client costs. You can enter time, expense per client, and mileage so you can get a realistic picture of revenue by project.

 

HelloSign

HelloSign is for anyone dealing with documents that need signatures. Send and sign online with a platform that’s secure and easy for users to understand. Plus, you can sign items right from common tools such as Gmail or other G-Suite apps.

Feature you need to be using: Store all your signed documents in the interface so you can find them later. (HelloSign will also automatically send reminders if someone hasn’t signed a form.)

 

Traditional Planner + Online Calendar

Pair a paper planner with your online calendar to keep track of tasks (paper planner as a checklist) as well as events and appointments (online calendar). Daily deadlines are best managed when you can jot them down and check them off throughout the day. Plus, that note is right in front of you to stay focused.

Feature you need to be using: Try a weekly paper planner, tear off sheets, or a dry erase board for task management that doesn’t seem overwhelming.

 

WeTransfer

WeTransfer makes sending large files a lot easier. There’s nothing worse than a file getting lost in cyberspace because it’s too big for email. WeTransfer allows you to send and receive big files with just a click. (And you don’t have to have an account to download files.)

Feature you need to be using: Integrate WeTransfer with other tools such as Slack, Sketch or Chrome for direct sharing from wherever you are working.

 

JotForm

JotForm is the ultimate tool for creating any type of online form, from simple surveys to signups to payment collection or image uploads. The service has free and paid plans, depending on usage and everything is customizable, so forms can be branded with ease.

Feature you need to be using: PDF Templates are ready-made forms for everything from a simple invoice to contracts or photo waivers. Start with a PDF and tweak as you need. Plus, you can set it up to be filled out digitally and returned to you. This is a huge timesaver, and you can save custom forms in your account to use over and over again.

 

Featured image via Unsplash.



Source link

Popular design news of the week: December 30, 2019 – January 5, 2020

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

 

Re-Imagining the Bottom Navigation Bar

 

The 20 Biggest Tech Flops of the 2010s

 

Neumorphism will not Be a Huge Trend in 2020

 

Bullet Journal Layout with CSS Grid, Subgrid & Flexbox

 

Kontent: All-In-One Content Design Tool

 

The Best and Worst Brand Designs of the Decade

 

Moca – Free Online Wireframing Tool

 

Top 8 Free Open Source Tools for Graphic Designers

 

Mobile UX Design Trends to Watch Out for in 2020

 

Fundamentals of Hierarchy in Interface Design

 

How to Get Ahead as a Freelance Designer in 2020

 

10 Tips to Improve your Typography Skills

 

The Best UX and Design Events in 2020

 

The 100 Most Famous Logos of All-Time

 

12 Color Tools to Boost Productivity for Designers

 

How to Become a Graphic Designer Without Going to University

 

Intelligent Apps for a Promising Future

 

The Bitter Truth About Being a UX Designer

 

Neal.fun – Bringing Back the Weird Web!

 

2019 in Review: 3 Website Design Myths

 

Every Sunrise of 2019 Website

 

Achieving Better Engagement Through UX – The Secret to Gamification

 

7 Requirements of a Holistic Design System

 

How to Make a Grid-Powered Resume

 

2020 will Be the Year AI Kills Company Dashboards

 

Want more? No problem! Keep track of top design news from around the web with Webdesigner News.



Source link

January in Mississippi can be nice

This pilot fish has January vacation plans: two weeks in Florida to visit his grandparents and take in Miami Beach.

What’s going on before then is that the manufacturing company that fish works for is converting its IBM Series/1 data-collection mini-computers from the EDI operating to a variation of Unix System 3. And there are problems. This variation of the OS doesn’t recognize disk packs with bad sectors. Fish’s company is using CDC removable disk packs, and if any sector is bad, the entire disk pack can’t be used. That can get expensive.

Surprisingly enough, the first several plants that get converted run fine, but the luck runs out with a plant in Mississippi, which has problems with bad sectors. Still, fish has learned enough from the IBM and CDC field engineers that he can run most diagnostics himself and assign bad sectors. Everything should be fine: The vendor for the OS is working on the code, and when fish comes back from vacation, they can install the new version.

But fish’s boss isn’t so sanguine, and before fish leaves, he insists that he check in. Once in a while? No. Once a day? Not quite. Every morning and every evening. Weekends included.

Fish feels as if work is nibbling away at his vacation, but he truly enjoys his job and says OK. And things go well enough — until day three. The Mississippi plant can’t function at all because it can’t run production schedules. Fish’s vacation has barely begun, and he’s at the airport in Miami trying to get a flight to Mississippi so he can install the new OS.

And did fish, who truly enjoys his job, learn anything from this? Well, next year, he went to Europe.

Sharky truly loves his job, too. Especially when you send me your true tales of IT life at [email protected]. You can also subscribe to the Daily Shark Newsletter.

Copyright © 2019 IDG Communications, Inc.



Source link

Throwback Thursday: It happens every January

A big pharmaceutical company installs a new payroll system and rolls it out in January — just in time for payday, reports a pilot fish on the scene.

“We had the war room ready for any calls related to issues with the first payroll for the year,” fish says.

“Come Friday morning, we got a call from the CEO’s admin saying the CEO’s check was wrong.

“Immediately, the top three project team members ran up to his office. CEO said the salary was correct, but the deductions were too high.

“After they examined his previous check stub from the end of December, they explained, ‘We do have to take Social Security and Medicare out of your first check of the year.’”

Sharky can’t wait until January for your true tale of IT life. Send it to me at [email protected]. You can also subscribe to the Daily Shark Newsletter and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.



Source link