Posts Tagged

Mode

Apple’s ‘Pro Mode’ is made for Mac professionals

Apple’s focus on the needs of professional computer users for its Macs and iPads ‘for the rest of us’ continues on news the company is developing a new ‘Pro Mode’ that pushes more performance for some apps.

The PC market will become a high-end market

Apple is focused on pro users because it recognizes that this section of the PC market will be the bulwark against wholesale replacement of computers with mobile devices.

Year by year, mobile systems are becoming increasingly viable alternatives for a growing quantity of the tasks PCs and Macs have traditionally handled.

An iPhone or iPad is all the computer required by many users, as the billion or so iOS devices currently in use prove.

This leaves a shrinking space for low-cost budget PCs and suggests the most robust part of the market is to be found in high-end systems.

That appears to be what Apple is betting on as it prioritizes Mac revenue growth – and this is also why the number of Mac units sold is less relevant than before, given so many PCs are replaced by mobile devices, or even low cost, low profit PCs.

It’s about how many Macs are sold into the more robust and less subject to mobile device replacement professional markets.

Apple’s pro Mac offerings are designed for those markets that are most resistant to replacement by mobile devices: music and movie/video production; games and interactive experience development; professional photography; architecture and design; scientific research and so on.

Such users will benefit from Apple’s purported Pro Mode, as they will be able to accelerate application performance for the tasks that most matter to them.

What is Pro Mode?

Pro Mode sounds a little like an on-demand overclocking technology.

As reported by 9to5Mac, a reference to it is included in the latest macOS Catalina 10.15.3 beta and it is described as something that can be turned on or off on demand by users.

The beta tells us that when in ProMode:

“Apps may run faster, but battery life may decrease and fan noise may increase.”

The beta seems to suggest that fan speed (and Pro Mode) will remain active overnight if not manually switched off.

The latter makes sense in some instances, such as when leaving your Mac to handle challenging rendering tasks overnight.

The report suggests the mode is aimed particularly at MacBook Pro users, citing improvements in the thermal design in the latest devices.

Effectively, the description seems to show systems that can optimize system performance in order to rouse more power and performance from specific apps, but does so on an ad hoc basis, enabling users to pick when to fully exploit the potential. (ie. When the system is connected to power).

Apple’s pro app teams

There has long been demand among Mac users for ways to safely optimize the power and performance of Macs beyond the box spec. At one time, the Mac market included companies (such as the still active Sonnet)whose sole focus was to make components that could boost Mac performance – effectively upgrading existing Macs.

Many Mac users may also have made use of software overclock tools designed to push system performance beyond official specifications.

The problem with such tools being that in some cases this made systems unstable or may even have caused damage, as the heat generated by overclocked systems exceeded the ability of the Mac’s thermal systems to maintain safe temperatures.

(A long time ago, I witnessed people point desk fans at overclocked Macs in an attempt to prevent them automatically shutting down when they get too hot).

Apple has teams of Mac users it works with in order to understand what its professional users need, and this on the ground knowledge now informs decisions it takes when designing new Macs.

This is particularly evident in the new (modular) Mac Pro.

With this in mind it seems quite possible that Apple is developing Pro Mode in answer to requests from those high-end users it works with, who sought some way in which to safely maximize Mac performance for specific high-end tasks.

It will be interesting to see how Apple positions this new software feature (if it ever ships), particularly in light of the new MacBook Pro models it is expected to introduce this year.

It will also be interesting to see if the company includes this capacity within the Mac mini, which is seeing use in pro markets for some demanding tasks.

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

Apple’s ‘Pro Mode’ is made for Mac professionals

Apple’s focus on the needs of professional computer users for its Macs and iPads ‘for the rest of us’ continues on news the company is developing a new ‘Pro Mode’ that pushes more performance for some apps.

The PC market will become a high-end market

Apple is focused on pro users because it recognizes that this section of the PC market will be the bulwark against wholesale replacement of computers with mobile devices.

Year by year, mobile systems are becoming increasingly viable alternatives for a growing quantity of the tasks PCs and Macs have traditionally handled.

An iPhone or iPad is all the computer required by many users, as the billion or so iOS devices currently in use prove.

This leaves a shrinking space for low-cost budget PCs and suggests the most robust part of the market is to be found in high-end systems.

That appears to be what Apple is betting on as it prioritizes Mac revenue growth – and this is also why the number of Mac units sold is less relevant than before, given so many PCs are replaced by mobile devices, or even low cost, low profit PCs.

It’s about how many Macs are sold into the more robust and less subject to mobile device replacement professional markets.

Apple’s pro Mac offerings are designed for those markets that are most resistant to replacement by mobile devices: music and movie/video production; games and interactive experience development; professional photography; architecture and design; scientific research and so on.

Such users will benefit from Apple’s purported Pro Mode, as they will be able to accelerate application performance for the tasks that most matter to them.

What is Pro Mode?

Pro Mode sounds a little like an on-demand overclocking technology.

As reported by 9to5Mac, a reference to it is included in the latest macOS Catalina 10.15.3 beta and it is described as something that can be turned on or off on demand by users.

The beta tells us that when in ProMode:

“Apps may run faster, but battery life may decrease and fan noise may increase.”

The beta seems to suggest that fan speed (and Pro Mode) will remain active overnight if not manually switched off.

The latter makes sense in some instances, such as when leaving your Mac to handle challenging rendering tasks overnight.

The report suggests the mode is aimed particularly at MacBook Pro users, citing improvements in the thermal design in the latest devices.

Effectively, the description seems to show systems that can optimize system performance in order to rouse more power and performance from specific apps, but does so on an ad hoc basis, enabling users to pick when to fully exploit the potential. (ie. When the system is connected to power).

Apple’s pro app teams

There has long been demand among Mac users for ways to safely optimize the power and performance of Macs beyond the box spec. At one time, the Mac market included companies (such as the still active Sonnet)whose sole focus was to make components that could boost Mac performance – effectively upgrading existing Macs.

Many Mac users may also have made use of software overclock tools designed to push system performance beyond official specifications.

The problem with such tools being that in some cases this made systems unstable or may even have caused damage, as the heat generated by overclocked systems exceeded the ability of the Mac’s thermal systems to maintain safe temperatures.

(A long time ago, I witnessed people point desk fans at overclocked Macs in an attempt to prevent them automatically shutting down when they get too hot).

Apple has teams of Mac users it works with in order to understand what its professional users need, and this on the ground knowledge now informs decisions it takes when designing new Macs.

This is particularly evident in the new (modular) Mac Pro.

With this in mind it seems quite possible that Apple is developing Pro Mode in answer to requests from those high-end users it works with, who sought some way in which to safely maximize Mac performance for specific high-end tasks.

It will be interesting to see how Apple positions this new software feature (if it ever ships), particularly in light of the new MacBook Pro models it is expected to introduce this year.

It will also be interesting to see if the company includes this capacity within the Mac mini, which is seeing use in pro markets for some demanding tasks.

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

5 iPhone Problems You Can Fix Using DFU Mode

Your iPhone isn’t impervious to problems. In fact, most of us experience at least a few issues with our iPhones throughout their lifespan. One of the strongest tools at your disposal for fixing these issues is iOS’s Device Firmware Update (DFU) mode.

DFU mode is a special iPhone state you can use to reinstall every line of software and firmware on your device. It’s the deepest possible restore for an iPhone, and is even more effective than putting it in recovery mode.

Here are some iPhone problems you can fix using DFU mode.

1. Unresponsive Devices

You might think you’ve got a bricked iPhone when actually it’s suffering from firmware problems. Among other tasks, the firmware is responsible for telling your iPhone how to respond to the different buttons on your device.

When you press the Sleep/Wake button, for example, the firmware starts booting up iOS. If your iPhone doesn’t power on, it could be because the firmware isn’t responding to that button correctly.

2. Boot Loops and Failed Startups

iPhone in Boot Loop with Apple logo on Screen
Image Credit: vencav/Depositphotos

A boot loop is the term for when your iPhone can’t get past the Apple logo during startup. This happens if there’s a problem with the operating software on your device.

It’s difficult to try other troubleshooting suggestions if you can’t get past the boot screen, but you can still put your iPhone in DFU mode. This lets you reinstall the software, overwriting any errors that caused the boot loop.

3. Firmware Corruptions

A lot of people already know how to use the iPhone’s recovery mode to fix corrupt software


How to Force Restart an iPhone and Enter Recovery Mode




How to Force Restart an iPhone and Enter Recovery Mode

If your iPhone is frozen, you need to reset it. When your iPhone won’t boot, recovery mode can help. Here’s how to use both of these features.
Read More

, but corrupt firmware is another matter entirely. If a popup message says your iPhone firmware is corrupt, your only option is to fix it using DFU mode.

Firmware corruptions affect all manner of components in your iPhone. They can lead to anything from slow performance to bad Wi-Fi connectivity. When you reinstall the firmware via DFU mode, it fixes all kinds of problems like this.

4. Failed Software Updates

Backlit iPhone with Software Update badge
Image Credit: ifeelstock/Depositphotos

There’s a reason your iPhone doesn’t start software updates when the battery is low. If you lose power mid-update, your operating software will end up in limbo. That usually means your iPhone can’t finish updating and can’t use the previous software either.

When you use DFU mode to restore your device, it overwrites the incomplete software with fresh code, updating your iPhone to the latest version of iOS in the process.

5. Hardware-Related Issues

Your iPhone firmware tells the device how to work with different hardware components. As a result, problems that seem as though they need a physical repair can actually be the result of faulty firmware.

Some of these issues include:

  • Erratic battery life
  • Unresponsive buttons
  • A blank display that’s all white or black
  • Unpredictable touchscreen responses

Before You Put Your iPhone in DFU Mode

iPhone creating an iCloud backup
Image Credit: Afotoeu/Depositphotos

If you’re experiencing any major problems with your iPhone, there’s a good chance you can fix them using DFU mode. When you restore your iPhone with this mode, it reinstalls the software and firmware and also erases all your content. Your iPhone should be as good as new by the time it’s finished.

That said, there are a couple of risks associated with DFU mode.

Make a Backup of Your iPhone First

When you restore your iPhone using DFU mode, it erases all the content on your iPhone. You need to ensure you have a recent backup first so you don’t lose any photos, videos, messages, apps, or other personal data.

It’s not possible to back up your iPhone after you put it in DFU mode. See our iPhone backup guide


How to Back Up Your iPhone and iPad




How to Back Up Your iPhone and iPad

Wondering how to back up your iPhone? Here’s our simple guide to backing up your iPhone using either iCloud or iTunes.
Read More

for more details on how to do it ahead of time.

Don’t Use DFU Mode on Damaged iPhones

If your iPhone is physically damaged, restoring it with DFU mode can make it totally unusable. It doesn’t matter whether you dropped your iPhone in water


How to Fix a Water-Damaged iPhone




How to Fix a Water-Damaged iPhone

Dropped your iPhone in water? Here’s how to fix a water-damaged iPhone, plus what you should avoid.
Read More

, cracked the screen, or broke the headphone port—if your device is damaged, we don’t recommend using DFU mode.

The reason for this is because DFU mode asks your iPhone to reconnect with various hardware components. If that isn’t possible due to damage, it can’t finish restoring the firmware and your iPhone is thus left unusable.

How to Put an iPhone in DFU Mode

iPhone in DFU mode connected to a computer

The process for putting your iPhone into DFU mode depend on which model iPhone you have. You’ll know you got it right if your computer recognizes the device but nothing shows up on the iPhone screen.

To start, use an Apple-certified USB cable to connect your iPhone to a computer. Once you complete the last step, if your iPhone screen stays blank, it is in DFU mode. You can follow the prompts on your computer to restore your device.

However, if you see a computer or iTunes icon on your iPhone screen, that means you put it in recovery mode instead. Reconnect your phone to your computer and repeat the instructions from step one again. It’s common to get the timing wrong when you first try it.

iPhone 8, iPhone X, and Later

  1. Quickly press and release the Volume Up button, followed by the Volume Down button.
  2. Press and hold the Side button.
  3. When the screen goes black, also press and hold the Volume Down button.
  4. Keep holding both buttons for five seconds, then release the Side button but keep holding the Volume Down button.
  5. Walk through the prompts on your computer.

iPhone 7

  1. Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button and the Volume Down button.
  2. Keep holding both buttons for eight seconds, then release the Side button but keep holding the Volume Down button.
  3. Keep holding the Volume Down button until your computer recognizes your iPhone.
  4. You can now restore your device using your computer.

iPhone 6S, iPhone SE, and Earlier

  1. Press and hold the Side (or Top) button and the Home button.
  2. Keep holding both buttons for eight seconds, then release the Side (or Top) button while still holding the Home button.
  3. Keep holding the Home button until your computer recognizes the iPhone.
  4. You’re now ready to complete the restoration process.

Get Your iPhone Repaired or Fix It Yourself

After you restore your iPhone using DFU mode, you shouldn’t have any more software or firmware problems. If it didn’t work, restore your device again but don’t recover any data from a backup. Should you do this and still have issues, your iPhone needs a physical repair.

Schedule an appointment with an Apple Authorized Service Provider to find out what part needs replacing. If your iPhone is covered under Apple’s warranty, you may be entitled to a free repair. Otherwise, there are plenty of websites that show you how to repair an iPhone yourself


Learn to Fix Your Own Gadgets With Help From These 5 Sites




Learn to Fix Your Own Gadgets With Help From These 5 Sites

Need to repair your smartphone, PC, MacBook, or other hardware? You can save money and time by doing it yourself with the help of these websites.
Read More

.



Source link

Will Windows 10 Update If My Computer Is in Sleep Mode?

Windows logo

Windows 10 will keep you safe and secure by applying updates automatically. Typically, users schedule “active hours,” so Windows 10 doesn’t install updates at inconvenient times. Will Windows 10 update if a PC is asleep? Technically, no.

Windows 10 Wakes Your Sleeping PC to Update

When your Windows 10 PC goes into sleep mode, it saves the current system state and stores that information into memory. The PC then goes into low-power mode, shutting mostly everything down save for the RAM sticks.

What happens next depends on your PC, its active power profile, and wake timers. The latter is your PC’s “alarm clock” within Windows 10 that pulls it out of sleep.

If you’re on a laptop, wake timers can be disabled while running solely on a battery. That means your laptop definitely won’t wake to update and overheat while stuffed in a bag. Plug the computer in, and it will likely wake only for important scheduled tasks.

Go into the power options where you’ll see three wake timer settings: Disable, Enable, and “Important Wake Timers Only.” System updates are one of many scheduled tasks that fall under that “important” umbrella.

You can also determine which tasks jolt your PC awake using the PowerShell, Event Viewer, and Task Scheduler.

Prevent Windows 10 from Waking by Disabling Wake Timers

Windows 10 provides the means to stop automatic updates while it sleeps, it’s just not apparent. Go into Settings > Update & Security > Advanced Options, and all you will find are settings to delay and pause “feature” and “quality” updates.

You can disable wake timers altogether so that nothing wakes your PC—not even drive scans or antivirus sweeps. As previously stated, this setting resides within your power plan listed in the Control Panel.

First, type “Control Panel” in the taskbar’s search field and select the resulting Control Panel desktop app. Select the “System and Security” option in the following window.

Next, under “Power Options,” click the “Change When the Computer Sleeps” link.

Change When Computer Sleeps

Select the “Change Advanced Power Settings” link in the next window.

Change Advanced Power Settings

The Power Options pop-up panel appears. Click the “+” next to “Sleep” in the list to expand this setting. After that, click the “+” next to “Allow Wake Timers” to expand this setting.

On a desktop, a single setting might say “Enable” or “Important Wake Timers Only” by default. Click this setting and select “Disable” in the drop-down menu.

Power Options Wake Timer Desktop

On laptops, you should see two specific settings: “On Battery” and “Plugged In.” Select “Disable” for both.

Power Options Wake Timer Laptop

Windows Update Won’t Wake Your PC from Hibernate

A hibernating PC won’t wake to update. It’s powered off, as hibernate is a deeper version of sleep mode that saves the current system state to the local hard drive or SSD, not the memory. The only difference between this mode and fully shutting down your PC is that apps, programs, and files remain open after waking from hibernation.

If you want to control how your PC hibernates, we have a guide for that, too. In summary, this setting resides in the Sleep section under Power Options. The path to this panel is Control Panel > Hardware and Sound > Power Options > Edit Plan Settings > Change Advanced Power Settings.

For desktop, you’ll see a “Hibernate After” setting. You can set it to “Never,” enter a specific time in minutes using the arrow buttons, or manually enter numbers with a keyboard.

On laptops, you might see hibernate enabled by default to conserve the battery charge. You’ll find the same “Hibernate After” entry broken into two settings: “On Battery” and “Plugged In.” Again, you can choose when hibernation begins—if at all—by entering the time in minutes.

A hibernate option is also located in the “Battery” section under “Power Options” on laptops. It’s one of three choices for the “Critical Battery Action” setting.

If your PC doesn’t have hibernation enabled, check out our guide to re-enable this mode in Windows 8 and Windows 10.





Source link

You Can Now Use Google Maps in Incognito Mode

Google is rolling out Incognito mode for Google Maps. Incognito mode for Google Maps is now available on Android, with iOS also getting the feature in the future. Which means you no longer have to worry about Google knowing your whereabouts.

What Does Incognito Mode Do?

Incognito mode has been a staple of Google Chrome for many years. Once enabled, it means you can browse the web privately, without other people who use the same device from being able to see your online activity.

This doesn’t offer VPN-levels of online privacy


The Best VPN Services




The Best VPN Services

We’ve compiled a list of what we consider to be the best Virtual Private Network (VPN) service providers, grouped by premium, free, and torrent-friendly.
Read More

, so your ISP, the websites you visit, and your employer will still be able to see what you’re doing online. However, it prevents Chrome from saving your browsing history, cookies, and information entered in forms.

Google Launches Incognito Mode for Google Maps

Now, Google Maps has its own Incognito mode. Once Incognito mode has been enabled, Google Maps won’t save your activity to your Google account. This includes the places you search for, and the destinations you ask for directions to.

According to Google Maps Help, turning on Incognito mode means Google will not “save your browse or search history or send you notifications, update your Location History or shared location, if any, or use your personal data to personalize Maps.”

How to Turn On Incognito Mode in Google Maps

To turn on Incognito mode in Google Maps, open the Google Maps app on your Android device. Then, tap on your profile picture. Then tap “Turn on Incognito mode”. You can turn it off again in the same way when you want to get a more personalized experience.

You can read more about Google Maps’ Incognito Mode in a post on The Keyword. Google also discusses expanding its Auto-delete feature to YouTube, using Google Assistant to control your privacy settings, and how to use Google’s Password Checkup tool


Google’s Password Checkup Helps You Stay Safe Online




Google’s Password Checkup Helps You Stay Safe Online

Google has launched a Password Checkup tool, which checks the strength and security of your passwords.
Read More

.





Source link