"> promises Archives - Engr Kabir Saleh

Posts Tagged

promises

Google promises to support Chrome on Windows 7 until July 2021

Google is promising to support Chrome on Windows 7 for at least the next 18 months.

“We will continue to fully support Chrome on Windows 7 for a minimum of 18 months from Microsoft’s End of Life date, until at least July 15, 2021,” Max Christoff, Chrome’s engineering director, wrote last week in a post to a company blog.

Christoff touted the post-retirement support as a win for enterprises, which over the last several years have designated Chrome as their workers’ primary browser. He highlighted the management tools Google offered as well as Chrome’s sync skills. “If you haven’t started your move to Windows 10 yet, or even if your organization is mid-way through migration, you can still benefit from the enterprise capabilities of Chrome,” Christoff contended.

That emphasis was no surprise. This week will mark not only the end of support for Windows 7 (Tuesday, Jan. 14) but also the public debut of Microsoft’s refurbished Edge (Wednesday, Jan. 15). Microsoft, which built the new Edge with Google’s Chromium technologies – the same that drive Chrome – has pitched the browser as a better fit for enterprises, based on Microsoft’s long history of management prowess.

It remained unclear on Monday how Microsoft will support its new Chromium-based Edge on Windows 7. Historically, Microsoft has stopped serving browser updates when the underlying operating system exited support. However, Edge on Windows 7 will, like Edge on Windows 10, be updated using mechanisms separate from the OS. Microsoft may continue to support its new Edge after this week on all Windows 7 PCs, not just those in organizations that have paid for Extended Support Updates (ESU).

Google’s pledge to support Chrome on Windows 7 for “a minimum of 18 months” was reminiscent of its support for the browser on Windows XP. Months before that operating system’s April 2014 retirement, Google told users it would support Chrome at least until the following April.

Google ended up supporting Chrome on XP for two years after the latter’s expiration, or until April 2016.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.



Source link

Apple’s Tim Cook has kept his $50B services promises

With Apple TV+ about to arrive and lots of love already being shown for Apple Arcade, Apple’s services business now seems certain to exceed CEO Tim Cook’s 2017 $50-billion-per-year promise.

What did Cook say?

Back in early 2017, Cook made some pretty aggressive promises around how his company planned to build its services business: “Our goal is to double the size of the services business in the next four years,” he said at the time.

He was announcing the results of the company’s December quarter, in which services generated $7.17 billion. More recently, Apple generated $12.5 billion in services in its just-passed September quarter (announced here) for a 2019 total of $46.3 billion in services alone.

Apple’s annual services income 2016-2019

  • 2016: $24.3B
  • 2017: $29.97B
  • 2018: $37.1B
  • 2019: $46.3B (up  roughly 25% year over year).

Apple has more or less doubled its services income since 2016, a level of growth most companies (and certainly this impecunious individual) can only ever dream of.

To put this into perspective, Apple’s new Arcade service was only available for a few days during its most recent quarter (on a free trial basis), while the company’s Next Big Thing, Apple TV+, remains unavailable so far.

The bottom line seems to be that Apple’s smartphone sales seem to be stabilizing and its wearables business has also grown to become a $10 billion industry in its own right.

Quite clearly, Apple management seems to have seen what was coming and to have planned for a strong post-smartphone future.

New business offerings

Apple’s new services seem destined to generate significant income. (Anecdotally, I have to say that I tried Arcade for a game called Oceanhorn 2 and am now becoming hooked on building motorways.)

At $4.99 a month, Arcade has proved itself sticky enough for me – and I’m not the only one with that experience. Engadget calls it “too cheap to quit,” and I agree.

Available on multiple platforms, Apple TV+ is likely to generate similar levels of early interest, during which the company will need to impress viewers (or not) with the quality of the its content.

Apple Pay transactions, meanwhile, are growing four times faster than PayPal, even as Apple prepares to offer 0% financing on new iPhones purchased using an Apple Card as it moves inevitably (and inexorably) toward offering Apple hardware as a service.

These new services will likely drive further revenue growth across Apple’s 2020 fiscal year, and this growth is likely to soon exceed Cook’s $50 billion/year services revenue target. (As some predicted).

We still have no sight yet of other service plays, such as consumer-focused AR gaming and immersive multimedia experiences, or the dragonish mist that is Apple Car.

Hello, Apple’s halo

Why is the company able to achieve this? Needham & Co. put it best in 2017:

“AAPL is an arms dealer that dominates the wealthiest segment of this rapidly growing consumer market,” the analysts said.

“Our research suggests that iOS platform churn is only about 12% annually, suggesting fewer competitive pressures, higher pricing power, more predictable revenue streams, and a halo effect that drives sister-device sales and higher ancillary revenue than AAPL’s current share price implies.”

That halo effect is precisely the same energy that enabled Apple to grow iPhone and Mac sales on the success of the iPod – itself created on the success of the iMac.

The AirPods Pro queues Apple’s PR teams are making sure we see outside Apple’s retail outlets this week suggest that halo is now migrating to the hit wearable products of the future, alongside the swell in services designed to support the above.

Meeting and exceeding targets

The bottom line for many investors must surely be that if Apple maintains current momentum its services segment seems set to be far bigger than the $50 billion per year business CEO Cook promised to build back in early 2017.

Perhaps one day his critics will accept this?

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2019 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

Apple’s Tim Cook has kept his $50b services promises

With TV+ about to hit and lots of love for Apple Arcade, Apple’s services business now seems certain to exceed CEO Tim Cook’s 2017 $50b/year promise.

What did Tim Cook say?

Way back in early 2017 Cook made some pretty aggressive promises around how his company planned to build its services business: “Our goal is to double the size of the services business in the next four years,” he said.

He was announcing the results of the company’s December quarter at the time, in which services generated $7.17 billion.

Apple generated $12.5 billion in services in its just gone September quarter (announced here) for a 2019 total of $46.3 billion in services alone.

Apple’s annual services income 2016-2019

  • 2016: $24.3b
  • 2017: $29.97b
  • 2018: $37.1b
  • 2019: $46.3b (up c.25% y-o-y).

Apple has more or less doubled its services income since 2016, a level of growth most companies (and certainly this impecunious individual) can only ever dream of.

To put this into perspective, Apple’s new Arcade service was only available for a few days during its most recent quarter (on a free trial basis), while the company’s Next Big Thing, Apple TV+, remains unavailable at time of writing.

The bottom lines seems to be that Apple’s smartphone sales seem to be stabilizing and its wearables business has also grown to become a $10 billion industry in its own right.

Quite clearly, Apple management seems to have seen what was coming and to have planned for a strong post-smartphone future.

New business offerings

Apple’s new services seem destined to generate significant income.

Anecodatally, I have to say that I tried Arcade for a game called Oceanhorn 2 and am now becoming hooked on building motorways.

At $4.99 a month Arcade has proved itself sticky enough for me – and I’m not the only one with that experience.Engadget calls it “too cheap to quit”, and I agree.

Available on multiple platforms, Apple TV+ is likely to generate similar levels of early interest, during which the company will need to impress viewers (or not) with the quality of the its content.

Apple Pay transactions, meanwhile, are growing four times faster than PayPal, even as Apple prepares to offer zero percent financing on new iPhones purchased using an Apple Card as it moves inevitably (and inexorably) toward offering Apple hardware as a service.

These new services will likely drive further revenue growth across Apple’s 2020 fiscal year, and this growth means it is likely to soon exceed Cook’s $50 billion/year services revenue target. (As some predicted).

We still have no sight yet of other service plays, such as consumer-focused AR gaming and immersive multimedia experiences, or the dragonish mist that is Apple Car.

Hello, Apple’s halo

Why is the company able to achieve this?

Needham & Co. put it best in 2017:

“AAPL is an arms dealer that dominates the wealthiest segment of this rapidly growing consumer market,” the analysts said.

“Our research suggests that iOS platform churn is only about 12% annually, suggesting fewer competitive pressures, higher pricing power, more predictable revenue streams, and a halo effect that drives sister-device sales and higher ancillary revenue than AAPL’s current share price implies.”

That halo effect is precisely the same energy that enabled Apple to build iPhone and Mac sales on the success of the iPod, itself created on the success of the iMac.

The AirPod Pro queues Apple’s PR teams are making sure we see outside Apple’s retail outlets suggest that halo is now migrating to the hit wearable products of the future, alongside the swell in services designed to support the above.

Meeting and exceeding targets

The bottom line for many investors must surely be that if Apple maintains current momentum then its services segment seems set to be far bigger than the $50 billion/y business Tim Cook promised to build back in early 2017.

Perhaps one day his critics will accept this?

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2019 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

Apple suspends Siri snooping (and promises more control for the rest of us)

Apple has once again proved that it listens to valid criticism with the immediate global suspension of the Siri listening program that attracted so much controversy.

When it comes to privacy, Siri listens

At issue was quality control.

A small number of conversational snippets were shared with third party human contractors for quality control purposes.

That sounds innocuous enough, the problem is that some of those conversational snippets were highly personal, and many took place without the people who were recorded being aware that Siri was listening.

They may not even have made a conscious request.

Another challenge is that the fact snippets were shared with third parties wasn’t clear in Apple’s terms and conditions and users were given no control or oversight over such use.

Overall, this wasn’t good look for a company that puts so much store in privacy.

The good news is that when it comes to the battle between commercial need as evidenced by human quality control vetting and privacy, privacy has won.

Apple is suspending the program and plans to give customers more control over it in future, the company said.

Update: Google has also suspended a similar scheme.

Privacy: 1; Surveillance: 0

In a statement supplied to TechCrunch, Apple said:

“We are committed to delivering a great Siri experience while protecting user privacy…

“While we conduct a thorough review, we are suspending Siri grading globally. Additionally, as part of a future software update, users will have the ability to choose to participate in grading.”

Grading is Apple’s term for the quality control process under which third-party operators would listen to snippets of conversation to figure out how accurately Siri had understood what was said.

This isn’t unusual – Amazon, Google and other voice recognition developers all do this.

[Also read: How ‘Find My’ Mac works in macOS Catalina and iOS 13]

Convenience versus services

However, as recognition of the need and value of privacy grows, we are all becoming more vigilant in our attempts to protect it.

This is exposing a clear division in tech industry business models between those who offer services for a fee and others who swap convenience for our personal data.

Apple doesn’t make its business from personal data – even the music, movies and photos recommendations it offers users are in part developed on the device.

With this in mind it also makes sense for Apple to provide tools to control this Siri grading process, and to ensure customers are aware that it happens at all.

It is somewhat of a misstep that it hadn’t recognized this need before now.

Apple does listen

Critics frequently (and incorrectly) slate Apple as being a remote, arrogant entity.

While it is certainly true the company maintains some degree of public aloofness, history shows it nearly always hears and responds to fair criticism.

It’s decision around Siri quality control grading is a perfect illustration of this: historical decisions around Maps, Macs and iOS batteries also showed this pattern, for example.

The one thing I’m not clear about in this story is where it emerged from.

The first report – which cited an insider from Apple’s third-party quality control teams — appeared in the Guardian, which isn’t really known for cutting edge Apple coverage.

Where did the source come from? What’s interesting about this is that the tale emerged as Apple faces attacks from multiple quarters around privacy and security – attacks it must have anticipated when it itself went on the attack around privacy at CES earlier this year.

What might this mean?

I think it means Apple’s message around the need for privacy and security is getting through, and those of its competitors who cannot match this commitment can see their market shifting.

They also recognize that Apple will continue to improve its privacy and security protections in future. This is driving them to go on the offensive.

Within this context it’s going to be interesting to see how dirty this part of the game gets. It also behoves Apple watchers and tech writers to really verify any claims they see, as it is reasonable to expect that some will be vexatious.

A great deal of money is at stake and privacy and user control of it are becoming winning cards in the game. And not every player holds those cards.

Also read: How to stay as private as possible on Apple’s iPad and iPhone.

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2019 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link