Posts Tagged

Reasons

6 big reasons to try the new Firefox Android preview

With all due respect to the physical abode around me, I practically live inside Google’s Chrome browser. Chrome is where I spend most of my days, during the week, at least — keeping up with all the latest tech info, using web-based apps like Trello, Docs, and Gmail, and watching the occasional video over on the Ye Ol’ YouTubes (always strictly work-related, of course).

At this point, I’ve got Chrome set up just the way I like it — with all sorts of custom shortcuts, crafty settings, and a carefully refined set of environment-enhancing extensions. The browser serves as a bridge between my various devices, both computers and phones, and makes it easy as can be for me to send text and links between ’em and find anything I’ve opened anywhere, anytime.

It works so incredibly well for me — and yet, I can’t help but feel the lure of another suitor, one that’s both comfortingly familiar and tantalizingly new.

I’m talking about Firefox, a browser I knew inside and out long before Chrome came along as the hot young thang and enticed me away many moons ago. The Firefox of today is a very different beast from that browser of yesteryear, though, and on Android in particular, it’s rapidly evolving into something quite intriguing.

I’ve been spending some time using the latest preview build of Firefox’s long-under-development revamped Android app, and lemme tell ya: It’s pretty darn good. And in many ways, it makes Chrome feel like the rusty old relic that Firefox once became.

Now, mind you, I’m not giving up on Google’s browser yet. Chrome is constantly evolving, and I’m heavily invested in the ecosystem around it. But on Android, at least, I’m finding myself going back and forth more and more between it and Firefox. And the more I use Firefox, the more I find myself enjoying the experience.

Right now, Mozilla — the parent organization behind Firefox — has way too many overlapping versions of its Android browser, and it’s practically impossible to figure out which is what. The “new” version of Firefox, though, is currently called Firefox Preview, and it’s the one you want to try out for the moment if you’re looking to get a relatively stable yet reasonably current view of what’s in the works.

Eventually, all the new elements from that app will make their way into the main Firefox Android app, and it’ll become advisable to switch to that — but for now, the preview version is the place to go for the good stuff.

But enough big-picture yimmer-yammer. Here, specifically, are six reasons I’m enjoying the new Firefox Android experience — and why I’d suggest you give it a whirl as well and consider it as an occasional Chrome supplement, if not something more:

1. The new Firefox preview is fast. Like, crazy fast.

On the desktop front, there are simple steps you can take to speed up Chrome and make it more efficient. On the mobile front, though, most of those possibilities aren’t present.

Well, guess what? In Firefox, they’re built right in. By default, the new Firebox Android app blocks a whole host of web-based trackers — which makes web pages load meaningfully faster, especially on sites (cough, cough) that are rather bloated with over-the-top scripts and ads (awkward eye darting).

Scrolling through such sites in Chrome and then doing the same in Firefox is a night and day difference. It’s immediately noticeable, and once you get used to the Firefox fast lane on your phone, it’s a teensy bit tough to go back.

And on a related note…

2. The Firefox Android app has built-in tools for privacy protection.

For a while now, I’ve been suggesting Mozilla’s Firefox Focus Android app as the easiest and most effective way to crank up your privacy for phone-based web browsing. While that app still exists and remains quite commendable, though, its same capabilities are built right into the new Firefox Preview app (and the plan seems to be for Focus to eventually be phased out in its favor).

In addition to the built-in tracker blocker we were just talking about — which you can configure to suit your own preferences, by the way, with a thorough set of options for how heavy-handed its blocking should be — the preview app has Focus-like features such as the ability to automatically delete any or all of your browsing data every time you exit the app (something Focus does fully by default).

Firefox Android browsing data JR

And there’s one more noteworthy possibility that ties into that same front.

3. The new Firefox has some interesting extension potential.

Taking a cue from desktop browsers, Firefox’s latest Android effort is being built with support for user-selected extensions in mind. For now, as of the latest preview build released this week, only one extension is available — but it’s something that’s quite relevant to our current conversation: uBlock Origin, the enhanced script-blocking extension that’s popular on the desktop and incredibly effective at increasing privacy while decreasing page load times (even more so than Firefox’s built-in mechanisms by themselves).

Long-term, Mozilla says it plans to migrate more extensions from its Recommended for Android collection so they’ll be available within the new browser. That list is dominated by privacy- and security-centric titles, including other script-blocking utilities along with smart add-ons such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s HTTPS Everywhere extension, which forces an encrypted connection even on sites that don’t offer that by default.

4. The latest Firefox preview has some handy built-in features, too.

Foundational stuff aside, the new Firefox Android app has a handful of native features that stand out to me as being especially useful.

There’s a single-switch Reader View, for example, which strips away extraneous elements and transforms any article into a pleasant reading experience — one where you can even control the size and style of the text along with the page’s color scheme, if you’re so inspired.

Firefox Android reader view JR

On Chrome, the closest equivalent to that is awkwardly buried, far more limited, and in constant danger of being deprecated.

Another tool I’ve come to appreciate is Firefox’s built-in Collections feature. Anytime you’re viewing a page, you can tap the app’s menu icon and select “Save to Collection,” then add the page into a group with whatever name you want. Your collections then show up in the tab management screen, along with the general overview of your presently open pages.

Firefox Android collections JR

It’s a strikingly simple and sensible way to organize tabs and hang onto stuff for later reference — and it’s something Google’s been struggling to get right in Chrome for a while.

The Firefox Preview app even lets you decide whether you’d rather have its main toolbar on the top or the bottom of the browser, as opposed to Chrome’s one-size-fits-all (with that size shifting slightly every few weeks, it seems) approach.

5. Firefox’s Android app has a genuinely helpful cross-service searching system.

Google’s great for finding information, but sometimes, you want to search another source — be it an alternative search engine or a specific sort of site like Amazon or Twitter.

While Google isn’t keen on making it particularly easy to search external places (without flat-out changing the entire browser’s single default search provider), Firefox makes it delightfully simple to do just that: Anytime you tap the app’s address/search bar, you’re presented with a list of choices. You can just start typing and search in Google, by default, or you can tap one of the other options and search directly in that service from that same spot — without having to make any lasting change to the browser’s default behavior:

Firefox Android search options JR

You can even add your own custom search engines into that same area, just like you can on most desktop browsers.

Firefox Android custom search engines JR

Having that sort of flexibility from your phone is pretty forkin’ useful, if you ask me — one of those things you quickly start to take for granted and then realize you miss when it’s no longer there.

6. Firefox on Android is familiar.

Despite all these differences, what makes Firefox particularly pleasant to use on the Android front is the fact that it looks and feels — well, an awful lot like Chrome.

I mean, look for yourself:

Chrome vs. Firefox Android JR

That’s Chrome on the left and Firefox on the right. You really have to look closely to spot the differences, don’t you?

Even the apps’ menus are eerily similar in style:

Chrome vs. Firefox Android (settings) JR

That means the adjustment of moving from Chrome to Firefox and vice-versa is generally pretty minimal. There are some areas that don’t entirely line up, like Firefox’s lack of tab-swiping shortcuts, but by and large, you don’t even think about the fact that you’re using something different.

All in all, there’s an awful lot to like about this latest Firefox Android effort — and the app isn’t even finished yet. Whether you ultimately decide to use the Firefox preview as a full-fledged Chrome replacement or just an occasional alternative, it’s well worth checking out and keeping a close eye on as its development progresses.

Sign up for my weekly newsletter to get more practical tips, personal recommendations, and plain-English perspective on the news that matters.

AI Newsletter

[Android Intelligence videos at Computerworld]

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.



Source link

10+ reasons enterprises need an employee choice program

In truth, the enterprise computing environment stopped being a monoculture many years ago; today’s businesses use a mix of platforms and devices to get things done – and this has led to an expansion in the number of companies offering employee choice programs.

What is an employee choice program?

The idea is pretty simple:

  • New employees joining a company are offered a choice of computing platforms and devices to use at work.
  • Company tech support is equipped to handle mixed-platform environments, and company IT infrastructure is designed to be platform agnostic.
  • Where legacy technologies are still in use, internal or outsourced IT will work to figure out workarounds to interoperability issues.
  • In many cases, these mixed-platform networks are supported by SaaS and other forms of cloud service provider.

So, why does your company need an employee choice program?

1: Because you want the best staff

There’s plenty of evidence to show that most new employees will choose an Apple when given the chance to do so. A PwC survey claims 78% of millennials believe having access to the tech they like at work makes them more effective.

2: Because you want to keep those staff

When you consider the cost of staff recruitment, it makes sense to retain workers  rather than replace them. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs tells us retention relies on lots of things: money helps, but so does autonomy, personal progression – and using great tools.

Apple’s products demonstrate remarkably high user satisfaction levels, and this reflects on employee satisfaction at work. IBM recently confirmed Net Promoter Scores among Mac-using employees to be three times that of Windows users at IBM (47.5 v. 15). That means Mac users are 17% less likely to leave the company. A Gensler Workplace study claims giving employees platform choice boosts innovation, performance and satisfaction at work.

3: You might save money

IBM made waves in 2016 when it told us its own experience reveals it saves over $500 when employees choose a Mac rather than a Windows PC for work.

Why?

In part because employees using Macs make less support requests – IBM claims Windows users are, “five times more likely to need on-site help desk support than Mac users.” (Interestingly, 31% of Mac problems relate to login and credential issues). In other words, Apple kit means the total cost of ownership (TCO) might be lower.

4: You could make money

SAP’s vice president for enterprise mobility, Martin Lang, IBM and other big names in enterprise IT claim that equipping employees with Apple’s solutions generates big gains in productivity. “The only way to increase productivity at SAP is to increase the productivity of the people,” Lang said.

5: Software and systems stay up-to-date

Apple publishes regular software updates for all its products, and these are easy to install, reducing the need for IT support to manage the process. And if they want to manage the process, there are plenty of systems that enable them to do so; 82% of Mac users at SAP are already on Catalina. And remember, Apple equipment tends to be less fault-prone and more reliable.

6: IT becomes a cost benefit

What happens when your highly experienced IT teams no longer need to spend their day upgrading computers and helping people with problems?

They get to do something else: your tech experts can focus on systems integration, software enhancements and building new digital technologies to help keep your business competitive.

IBM says it needs one engineer to support 10,000 Windows devices, but notes that that same engineer can support 30,000 Macs.

7: Migration is easier

With cloud services ascendant and enterprise-focused MDM systems such as Jamf or Addigy available to enterprise IT, the fact that Apple has made it super-easy to migrate from one of its devices to a replacement device isn’t just a convenience, it’s a measurable cost benefit. IBM reckons five times as many Windows users as Mac users have problems migrating to a new system.

8: Old tech never dies

Four years on and your Apple equipment retains a relatively high resale value. How you choose to release that value is up to you: give EOL machines to staff, sell or part exchange them for new equipment?

That thousand-dollar PC may raise you $200 four years later, while that thousand-dollar Mac may yield $400. That value can go back into your business in cash or in improved employee satisfaction.

9: Macs can run Windows

Apple’s Boot Camp lets you run a Windows partition on your Mac. You can also use third-party solutions such as VMWare or Parallels to run the rival OS. This support means you can continue to use Apple kit with legacy Windows-based systems and/or business processes while you replace or upgrade them.

And if your Windows install gets a virus, it’s much easier to replace a virtual partition than an entire Windows machine.

10: Mobile apps for all

iPhones are already in wide use across enterprise IT. iPad use is growing fast. Apple’s Catalyst tech makes it possible to more easily port iOS apps from iPads to Macs, which means those mobile tools you’ve built for your mobile teams will work across all three platforms. As every enterprise becomes a mobile enterprise, this makes a big difference.

11: Look at the evidence

IBM CIO Fletcher Previn said in 2019: “…I don’t know if better employees want Macs, or giving Macs to employees makes them better. You got to be careful about cause and effect — but there seems to be a lot of corroborating evidence that says you want to have a choice program.”

Please follow me on Twitter, or join me in the AppleHolic’s bar & grill and Apple Discussions groups on MeWe.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.





Source link

The Top 3 Reasons for Building Wi-Fi and IoT Convergence Networks

In the near future, human and robot collaboration will be the norm for digital enterprises of all sizes. According to the 10 technology megatrends predicted in Huawei’s Global Industry Vision (GIV) 2025 report, there will be an average of 103 robots for every 10,000 employees in the manufacturing industry by 2025.

The overall digitization trend sweeping industry extends far beyond manufacturing, too, as other industry verticals deploy wireless technologies and Internet of Things (IoT) to become more competitive. For example, in the automobile industry, in-vehicle software is updated over Wi-Fi while the energy and construction industries use IoT to realize predictive Operations and Maintenance (O&M). Elsewhere, remote medical care is increasingly common in the healthcare industry, and cities and public sectors are incorporating more technology into asset management systems.

Indeed, investment in IoT and wireless technologies is creating opportunities for enterprises to create groundbreaking business models, improving the user experience and increasing operational efficiency. As detailed in Forrester’s Internet-Of-Things Heat Maps for Operational Excellence, 2019 report, more than 70% of enterprises have already implemented or plan to implement IoT solutions and applications. And it’s worth noting that such a notably high — and growing — adoption rate is mainly driven by rising requirements from service departments, rather than coming from IT departments.

There is no one-size-fits-all solution for IoT networks, however. Solutions must be tailored to individual enterprises, since requirements for bandwidth, reliability, transmission distance, and power consumption of IoT terminals vary depending on production needs. But the abundance of aspect-specific IoT protocols make finding the optimal solution a challenging task for any enterprise.

IoT protocols are largely divided into two kinds, based on transmission distance: Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) and Low-Power Wireless Personal Area Networking (LoWPAN). LPWA is applicable to long-distance Wide Area Network (WAN) coverage, while LoWPAN performs better in medium- and short-distance indoor coverage scenarios. Furthermore, typical LoWPAN protocols include Bluetooth for precise locations (with meter-level accuracy), ZigBee for mesh networking at low-power consumption, power-hungry Wi-Fi technologies for providing large transmission bandwidth, and low-power Radio Frequency Identification (RFID).

The transmission distances of these protocols are at different tiers, ranging from 10 centimeters to 200 meters. Most LoWPAN protocols comply with IEEE 802.15.4, which means they can be applied on IoT networks connected to the same gateway. The wide range of deployment modes for these IoT networks, however, can lead to unnecessary IoT network reconstruction, complicating network construction and management. Enterprises would therefore certainly benefit from an open network architecture that is compatible with multiple, mutually independent IoT networks.

Wi-Fi and IoT converged deployment and management is a vital component for creating an open and well-performing network architecture. The deployment of multiple LoWPAN protocols on a single unified enterprise Wi-Fi network offers:

Reduced network construction costs: Built-in or external IoT modules on Access Points (APs) enable Wi-Fi and IoT networks to share network infrastructure, including sites and backhaul lines. This effectively reduces hardware investment, cuts down on hardware installation time, and reduces Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) by 50%.

Reduced network management costs: A Wi-Fi and IoT converged management platform offers intelligent analysis that optimizes network planning. For example, wireless technologies with similar frequency bands are selected to minimize interference; when interference does occur, it can be automatically detected. This new approach is vastly superior to traditional networks, where multiple siloed management platforms can only detect and rectify interference after services have been affected, and administrators have to go through the arduous process of collecting information on each platform, manually analyzing and troubleshooting faults.

Broadens business opportunities: With the agreement and approval of customers, terminal data such as location and status is integrated and sent to the service platform. This approach improves the accuracy of customer profiles and customer behavior analysis, enabling enterprises to provide personalized services.

In recent years, traditional brick-and-mortar shopping malls and supermarkets have increased their efforts to transition into the new retail arena, as pressure from e-commerce mounts. For example, a large European supermarket chain has taken the initiative to modernize by optimizing the shopping experience at their facilities while also improving operational efficiency. The initiatives, targeting both customers and employees, range from new shopping guides and marketing campaigns, to delivering office services via Wi-Fi and adopting RFID-based Electronic Shelf Labels (ESLs).

Using ESLs, the supermarket chain’s operation capabilities have been expanded, enabling remote price updates in batches and electronic shelf management. To achieve this, the supermarket chain deployed Huawei AirEngine APs with built-in RFID modules and a unified network management platform, achieving converged access and simplified management of multiple terminals. As a result, it is estimated that each of the chain’s stores in Germany deploying the technology saves up to US$37,000 per year in costs related to price updates, including labor costs. Given this success, the supermarket plans to adopt the technology across more than 10,000 stores worldwide.

Such benefits are not limited to new retail, however. Huawei also offers leading Wi-Fi & IoT convergence networks for a wide range of industries, including smart buildings, logistics, and education, driving innovations in specialized digital services.

The question then is: how can an enterprise select a Wi-Fi & IoT convergence solution best adapted to its requirements?You can find the answer in the latest edition of “The Forrester New WaveTM: Wireless Solutions, Q3 2019” report, which covers the LoWPAN market. In the report, Forrester analyst Andre Kindness suggests that Huawei’s Wi-Fi & IoT convergence solution “is the best fit for companies needing to use multiple wireless technologies.”

Learn more about Huawei’s Wi-Fi & IoT convergence solution to plan your network deployment.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.



Source link

3 reasons you can’t fight facial recognition

Back in the day — by which I mean a period starting with the emergence of homo sapiens around 500,000 years ago until the day before yesterday — it was possible for humans to walk around in society completely unrecognized and without any record of them having been there.

At some point in the future, it will be impossible to drive, shop, walk, go to work or function without being recognized by machines that will permanently record the fact of your presence in that place at that time.

Right now, we’re in transition between the world of anonymous living and the always-recognized future.

Is the future a biometric convenience and security utopia? Or Orwellian nightmare. The answer is: Yes.

The biometric backlash

A movement opposing face recognition technology deployed by cities, universities and others is spreading, as the public begins to grapple with emerging biometric technology for identifying people.

Biometric technologies have been emerging for decades, with fingerprints, iris scanning and other technologies becoming more reliable.

Face-recognition is seen by the anti-biometric public because the “biometric data” — i.e., a picture of your face — can be “collected” at a great distance by an ordinary camera. And it can be “captured” with a camera — or even from pictures posted online.

Another trend driving the infrastructure for municipal and police face recognition is the so-called “smart city” movement. The cornerstone of the trend is the installation in each city of “smart street lights,” which contain connected cameras and other sensors ideal for total biometric surveillance. Regardless of face recognition bans, these fixtures are capable of putting a face-recognizing, licence-plate-reading, always listening devices every 100 yards on every street in a city.

Log in or subscribe to Insider Pro to read the full column.

 

Back in the day — by which I mean a period starting with the emergence of homo sapiens around 500,000 years ago until the day before yesterday — it was possible for humans to walk around in society completely unrecognized and without any record of them having been there.

At some point in the future, it will be impossible to drive, shop, walk, go to work or function without being recognized by machines that will permanently record the fact of your presence in that place at that time.

Right now, we’re in transition between the world of anonymous living and the always-recognized future.

Is the future a biometric convenience and security utopia? Or Orwellian nightmare. The answer is: Yes.

The biometric backlash

A movement opposing face recognition technology deployed by cities, universities and others is spreading, as the public begins to grapple with emerging biometric technology for identifying people.

Biometric technologies have been emerging for decades, with fingerprints, iris scanning and other technologies becoming more reliable.

Face-recognition is seen by the anti-biometric public because the “biometric data” — i.e., a picture of your face — can be “collected” at a great distance by an ordinary camera. And it can be “captured” with a camera — or even from pictures posted online.

Another trend driving the infrastructure for municipal and police face recognition is the so-called “smart city” movement. The cornerstone of the trend is the installation in each city of “smart street lights,” which contain connected cameras and other sensors ideal for total biometric surveillance. Regardless of face recognition bans, these fixtures are capable of putting a face-recognizing, licence-plate-reading, always listening devices every 100 yards on every street in a city.

Resisting biometrics is rational. It’s also futile, and for three reasons.

1. The imperfection of face recognition is temporary

Campaigners are forcing state and local police departments to ban face recognition technology. Laws against the technology are spreading. And the number-one reason for these bans is that current technology tends to be less accurate when recognizing women and minorities.

But within a few years, face recognition technology will be essentially perfected, and everybody will be recognized faithfully by the technology. Will these same campaigners then welcome police use of face recognition? I doubt it.

2. The primacy of face recognition is temporary

As face recognition gets perfected, it will also be augmented by even more effective technologies. The weakness of face recognition is that…. it requires a face. How can you recognize someone from the back, or someone wearing Groucho glasses?

The solution to this problem is a wide range of alternative biometrics that, thanks to the rise of AI, are enabling people to be recognized by all kinds of body parts.

One is gait recognition. The way a person lumbers along while walking is as individual as fingerprints, and AI can recognize how someone walks.

Gait can be detected now not only by cameras, but also using thermal imaging. Best of all, thermal imaging technology can recognize individuals by both gait and face recognition — whatever body parts are available. Intel technology recently demonstrated 99.5 accuracy in thermal imaging technology. One way to use thermal imaging is to recognize the pattern of blood vessels beneath the surface of the skin, which are so unique that even identical twins have completely different patterns.

The Pentagon is throwing a lot of money at thermal-recognition technologies. Their requirements say that recognition needs to happen in conditions where visible-light cameras struggle — through windshields, through fog and in the face of strong backlight. And the technology needs to work as far away as 500 meters.

We all know how this works. The Pentagon invests heavily in advanced technology, yada, yada, yada, consumers are buying that technology at BestBuy ten years later.

In the future, you’ll be able to be positively ID’d while wearing Groucho glasses in a dark alley on a foggy night from 500 meters away.

Most emerging biometric technologies are pretty gross. Other emerging biometric technologies include ear-canal recognition that will ID you when you insert earbuds. The shape of the external ear is also unique and identifying. Researchers are also improving methods for identifying people using vein patters in the palm or back of the hand or on fingertips, skin patterns generally, body odor — you name it. And, of course, there’s DNA matching, in which skin flakes, hair, blood or just about any tiny chunk of a person and process it for a perfect match. (The ramifications of DNA matching were brilliantly explored in the 1997 movie, Gattaca.)

While activists worry about police departments and large organizations using biometric identification, the reality is that billions of biometric-enabled consumer electronics gadgets are now being sold. Most smartphones now have fingerprint readers, face recognition or both. Home security cameras are increasingly outfitted with face recognition. And this includes doorbell cameras pointed at the street. Cars, laptops, smart glasses, smart watches and TV sets will all get biometric identification sensors, too.

The full range of AI-enabled biometric technologies, techniques and products means you’ll be identifiable up close, far away, in the dark, while you’re driving and while you’re not driving. Your face, voice, ears, walk, vascular system and DNA will all give you away.

3. The public resistance to biometrics is also temporary

Opposition to biometric identification depends on how you ask the question.

If you ask: “Do you want to live in a world where you are recognized all the time, everywhere?,” people will say they hate it.

If you ask: “Do you want to never wait in line or type your credit card information again, for more criminals to be caught, for enterprise networks to be secure,” they will say they love it.

The biggest benefit is convenience. Good biometrics means shopping without lines, according to Amazon’s Go concept. Amazon, which owns Whole Foods Market, is aggressively pursuing stores where you walk it, grab whatever you want and walk out. Biometrics recognizes you, other sensors recognize what you take, and your credit card is automatically charged.

The biometric future means no more swiping your badge to get into the office or even unlock the door, no more carrying a wallet, no more entering passwords, no more airport security or boarding lines.

Beyond incredible convenience, biometric ID promises more public safety, safer cars, better healthcare, and enhanced national security.

It also could go a long way to helping the good guys in two conundrums facing enterprise security managers. The first is the arms race between cybercriminals and cybersecurity. And the other is the contest between security and productivity or usability.

Stated another way, as cyber-intruders grow more sophisticated in their methods, enterprise security specialists have to resort to more extreme measures, which creates problems and obstacles for workers.

The combination of AI threat detection, plus AI-driven biometrics, could help secure enterprise resources without overburdening employees. We’re entering the age of identity-defined and identity-centric security in large organizations.

The benefits of biometrics are winning the argument. An IBM survey found acceptance growing, with 67 percent of survey respondents “comfortable” with using biometrics — a whopping 75 percent of millennials also “comfortable.”

You can see this growing acceptance in the consumer acceptance of biometrics to secure payments. Juniper Research predicts that biometrics will provide the security for $2.5 trillion in mobile payments over the next four years.

People want both convenience and security, and so biometrics will win the argument.

How to think about the future of biometric security

Biometrics will solve a huge number of problems and make the world a better place.

Biometrics will make the world more like an Orwellian nightmare of total surveillance, where we’re all tracked and identified everywhere we go.

Both are true. Biometrics are both good and bad.

But here’s what matters: Ubiquitous biometrics are inevitable. And this is true not because technology advances on its own regardless of what the public thinks. It’s true because the public will overwhelmingly want biometrics.

So biometrics are taking over. And, as with so many previous technologies that are both good and bad, we’ll muddle along with legal battles, hack attacks on biometric databases and personal struggles as we weigh the costs against the benefits.

But don’t be deluded. We’re entering the era of universal biometrics. Resistance is futile. You WILL be identified.



Source link

7 reasons Chromebooks are ideal for enterprises

Are Chromebooks on their way to becoming mainstream computers in the enterprise?

Not quite yet. But there’s no doubt that laptops that run on Chrome OS have gained traction in the market and will continue to do so as enterprises move deeper into cloud infrastructures and apps.

There are several well-known reasons for adding Chrome OS devices to your arsenal, including tighter security, easier management and greater ease of use for your workforce. If users know their way around the Chrome browser, they can use a Chromebook. Here are seven additional reasons why your organization might want to consider Chrome OS computers in 2020.

1. Chromebooks are hot

In terms of traditional desktop and laptop device global sales, Windows is expected to comprise 83% of the market in 2020, with Chrome OS and macOS in second place at 7.5% each, according to Linn Huang, research vice president of devices and displays at research firm IDC.



Source link