Posts Tagged

tools

Remote desktop software: 8 enterprise-friendly IT support tools

For many companies, IT support has typically meant a member of the help desk walking over to an employee’s desk and looking over their shoulder to fix any problems, or a quick one-to-one connection between an IT staffer and a remote office employee. With a majority of employees and IT staffers now working at home due to Covid-19, the need for enterprise-level software that can support these larger numbers has also grown.

Remote access tools have been around for years, with a range of features and benefits for companies and individuals looking to help less tech-savvy users with computer issues and maintenance. At its base level, the software creates a secure connection between one person’s computer and a remote connection, allowing the first user to operate the second computer as if they were in the same room. Once the connection is made, several other features such as screen sharing, program installation, file transfer, text chat, and audio and video communications are supported.

Many of these features are also seen in other categories of software, such as web conferencing or videoconferencing apps, which can confuse buyers looking at options for their IT remote assistance needs. In addition, many companies that offer remote support software also offer remote monitoring and management tools, which can actively or passively monitor equipment and devices beyond an employee’s desktop.

There is good news, however: Many of the remote assistance software companies offer tiered levels, allowing for a free download, trial or entry-level version for users to try out, with professional and/or enterprise versions that expand the number of licenses or concurrent sessions allowed. So this category lends itself very well to the idea of “try before you buy.”

Presented below are quick descriptions and links to some of the more popular options for enterprise remote assistance tools, based on our research of the market and the features that most companies would likely need. Your individual feature needs may vary, so head to the company’s website to learn more details about each tool.



Source link

Exciting New Tools For Designers, May 2020

There are plenty of new tools to speed up your work available now. From background patterns and icons to landing page templates and new fonts, we’ve got something for almost everyone here. And while some of these tools are premium options, almost everything is free and open-source.

Here’s what’s new for designers this month.

 

Pattern.css

Pattern.css is a CSS-only library that you can use to fill empty backgrounds. There are tons of pattern options available and you can search and sort by the type of pattern that appeals to you – grids, dots, lines, stripes, zigzags, and more.

pattern

 

Image Compare Viewer

Image Compare Viewer is a lightweight slider that lets you see changes to images in a before and after format. Use it for grading, CGU, and pretty much any other type of comparison. It uses vanilla JavaScript and has no dependencies. (There’s also a plugin for WordPress users.)

image-compare

 

Scale Document

Scale Document is a secure platform for document processing. The coolest feature of this tool is that it can scan documents, “read” them, and turn them into digital data. It’s a paid tool with options for different use cases.

scale

 

Screen Recorder

Screen Recorder is a minimal progressive web app that does exactly what you would expect. Allow access and record screens (and audio) with a click. It’s free and doesn’t include watermarks or ads.

recorder

 

Codespace

Codespace is an app to organize code snippets into folders. Then you can search, share, and access code anytime. It’s a paid app that works cross-platform.

codespace

 

GitKraken Timelines

GitKraken Timelines is a free tool to communicate milestones and deadlines. Create private or public shareable timelines. Plan product releases and provide visibility across your organization or just have fun.

timelines

 

Tara AI

Tara AI is a modern product development platform. As an alternative to Jira, it lets you run sprints and planned release cycles on time. (It’s still in beta and free to try.)

tara

 

CSS Inspector

CSS Inspector lets you get the CSS code of any web element with the inspector. The premium tool is a quick and easy way to inspect and edit live webpages without coding.

cssinspector

 

BestTime

BestTime is a neat API that forecasts how busy a business will be at any given hour. It looks at week, peak, busy, quiet hours, and provides live busyness comparisons and dashboards.

besttime

 

Cakeurl

Cakeurl is a link shortener that adds “superpowers” to your links, such as calls to action, retargeting pixels, and analytics.

cakeurl

 

Brandfetch for Adobe XD

Brandfetch for Adobe XD lets you pull the brand assets into your software. Just enter the company name and add everything instantly. The tool is free for small companies and developers and has paid plans for power users.

brandfetch

 

Free HTML Landing Page Templates

This roundup of 40 Free HTML Landing Page Templates is a great collection to help jumpstart website design projects. The best part is every option is open source and the collection includes a variety of page types for different products and services.

landing-pages

 

Animockup

Animockup is a tool to create free, animated product mockups using your images and information. Use it to make animated videos to showcase new or upcoming projects.

animockup

 

Database Schema Templates

Database Schema Templates is a collection of real-world databases that you can use when developing the architecture of an app. Everything is open source.

schema

 

Sitesauce

Sitesauce converts your dynamic website (such as a blog) into a static website in one click and keeps the site updated when content changes. This will help reduce server costs and page load times and increase scalability and security.

sitesauce

 

SQL PD

SQL Police Department is a game where you solve crimes using SQL, while learning more about the language.

sqlpd

 

LineIcons 2.0

LineIcons is a set of 2,000 line icons in 20 categories and two weights. Icons come in SVG, Web Font, AI, and React formats. This kit includes free and pro versions.

lineicons

 

GitHub Writer

GitHub Writer is a browser extension that changes GitHub’s default editor to a WYSIWYG rich-text editor. You can use it when creating, editing, or commenting on GitHub issues, pull requests, and wikis.

gitwrite

 

Caddy 2

Caddy 2 is an open-source web server with automatic HTTPS written in Go. Plus, it renews certificates automatically.

caddy

 

Swiftify

Swiftify is a tool to convert a storyboard to SwiftUI in just three steps: Upload, output, apply fixes. That’s it.

swift

 

Alejo

Alejo is a beautiful line typeface for display use. (It also includes a solid option.) With curved lines and a thick style, it is made to use large.

alejo

 

Good Boy

Good Boy is a novelty font for dog lovers. The character set includes letters and numbers but is somewhat limited after that.

goodboy

 

Lovely Ampersand

Lovely Ampersand is a beautiful handwriting-style typeface that would be lovely for invitations. Take special note of the glyphs with long tails for a more elaborate feel.

loveampersand

 

Macklin Pro

Macklin Pro is a new superfamily that includes desktop, web, and variable fonts. It’s versatile, highly readable, and with serifs, sans serifs, slabs, and some beautiful italics, it might be the only font you need for projects. (And while this font is new, they are offering it at a stellar deal of less than $50.)

macklin



Source link

Comparing 3 top project management tools: Trello vs. Monday vs. Asana

If you’re shopping for an online project management tool, you could be forgiven for feeling overwhelmed. Luckily, there are three good ones that are free – or at least free to try – so that you can find a good fit for managing your deadlines and projects. 

We decided to check out popular online services that are all good choices for assigning work and tracking progress – Trello, Monday and Asana. Each takes a slightly different approach, however, so we considered how each of these tools might appeal to different types of users. Let’s take a look.

Trello

Target audience: Project owners who want an elegant way to keep on top of things, for ongoing projects. 

Trello uses an elegant, visual approach to project management. The interface features an agile-inspired Kanban board, with columns of tasks displayed on cards. It’s a very efficient and friendly to see what’s coming, in progress, or done.

Moving cards and changing who they’re assigned to is a simple, drag-and-drop affair. When you start a new project, you’ll create a new board, add tasks and if necessary, rename the columns – which Trello calls lists – to suit your needs. Click the Home button, and you can view all your boards in one place.

[ Related: 14 Microsoft Teams apps to help you work smarter ]

To help get started, Trello offers dozens of prebuilt templates. Some of the templates include boards, for example, that help you create a software product, organize a meeting, or manage a publishing schedule for a blog. 

trello boards Trello

You can add one of Trello’s pre-designed boards with a few clicks, then customize it to fit your project.



There are also community-created boards you can select in Trello. Project managers have posted boards designed for making and tracking a big decision, for example, or setting objectives and tracking results. You can also submit your own templates to share on Trello for others to use.

Trello provides optional add-on features called “power-ups,” which enhance the interface, automate a process, or integrate with a third-party tool. The calendar power lets you view due dates in, you guessed it, a calendar view. The Card-Repeater power-up automates the creation of cards you use regularly. And you can add power-ups to integrate with third-party tools, like Google Drive, to easily access project files in the cloud. There are also integrations for, among others, Microsoft Office, Slack and Salesforce. To use some power-ups, or to use more than one per board, you’ll need a paid plan. 

Log in or subscribe to Insider Pro to read the complete comparison.

 

If you’re shopping for an online project management tool, you could be forgiven for feeling overwhelmed. Luckily, there are three good ones that are free – or at least free to try – so that you can find a good fit for managing your deadlines and projects. 

We decided to check out popular online services that are all good choices for assigning work and tracking progress – Trello, Monday and Asana. Each takes a slightly different approach, however, so we considered how each of these tools might appeal to different types of users. Let’s take a look.

Trello

Target audience: Project owners who want an elegant way to keep on top of things, for ongoing projects. 

Trello uses an elegant, visual approach to project management. The interface features an agile-inspired Kanban board, with columns of tasks displayed on cards. It’s a very efficient and friendly to see what’s coming, in progress, or done.

Moving cards and changing who they’re assigned to is a simple, drag-and-drop affair. When you start a new project, you’ll create a new board, add tasks and if necessary, rename the columns – which Trello calls lists – to suit your needs. Click the Home button, and you can view all your boards in one place.

[ Related: 14 Microsoft Teams apps to help you work smarter ]

To help get started, Trello offers dozens of prebuilt templates. Some of the templates include boards, for example, that help you create a software product, organize a meeting, or manage a publishing schedule for a blog. 

trello boards Trello

You can add one of Trello’s pre-designed boards with a few clicks, then customize it to fit your project.

There are also community-created boards you can select in Trello. Project managers have posted boards designed for making and tracking a big decision, for example, or setting objectives and tracking results. You can also submit your own templates to share on Trello for others to use.

Trello provides optional add-on features called “power-ups,” which enhance the interface, automate a process, or integrate with a third-party tool. The calendar power lets you view due dates in, you guessed it, a calendar view. The Card-Repeater power-up automates the creation of cards you use regularly. And you can add power-ups to integrate with third-party tools, like Google Drive, to easily access project files in the cloud. There are also integrations for, among others, Microsoft Office, Slack and Salesforce. To use some power-ups, or to use more than one per board, you’ll need a paid plan. 

Trello offers three tiers. The Free plan lets you create unlimited cards, lists and boards, with an attachment limit of 10MB. And you can use one power-up per board. Business Class adds priority support, unlimited powerups and additional third-party app integration.

Trello is an excellent choice for individuals and small teams that need a basic, free tool. It’s also good for executives who want a tool for quickly spinning up ideas without a steep learning curve. By comparison, Monday may be a better fit for any process that is typically managed with spreadsheets, where you’re interested in reducing the need to create them from scratch. And if you’re looking to manage a large project with many teams and deadlines, Asana may be a better choice. 

Monday

Target audience: Nontechnical users, creatives and spreadsheet pros. 

If you’re spending too much time in spreadsheets, manually adding tasks, deadlines and charts to show what’s happening on your projects, Monday might be the right tool for you.

In Monday, the default view – called Main Table – looks like a simple, attractively designed, color-coded spreadsheet. Here, you enter new tasks, assign them, and show their status: For example: Working on it, Stuck, Done, or Waiting for Review. You can quickly see how projects are coming along, and the status of those working on them.

Click a menu and you then see that same information in Monday’s Kanban view, with lists displayed on cards, providing a quick visual snapshot of where your project stands. Another view called Timeline can display projects with concurrent deadlines. Or you can view your deadlines in a calendar. A chart view lets you break tasks down visually by percentages, for example to see how many tasks each member is handling. As with Trello, you’ll need a paid plan to use some of these features. 

monday main table view Monday

Monday’s Main Table view is an excellent way to see who’s doing the work, the deadlines for task, and when the jobs are completed.

It also costs more to add some integrations, like Github, Outlook and Zendesk. Monday also offers integrations with Trello and Asana, so coworkers or clients who work in those tools can add tasks and deadlines there, which will automatically appear in Monday’s interface. Upgrading your plan also means the ability to use automations. Monday offers pre-written automations you can customize, taking a trigger like a date, or a change in status, to fire off an action, like creating a recurring task.

Monday doesn’t offer a free version, however, they do provide a 7-day free trial. After that, pricing starts at $39 per month per user, for their Basic plan. The Standard Plan is $49, this option adds features like a Gantt chart view (called Timeline) and a calendar, and you can share your boards with people without requiring them to sign up for a Monday account. The Pro plan costs $79, for additional views and enterprise features like time tracking. For a full plan comparison click here

Monday is easy on the eyes for nontechnical staff and may appeal to creatives, like designers and ad staff, or anyone who finds that spreadsheets are the way to stay on top of projects. Like Trello, it’s better for ongoing deadlines, rather than large projects that have a hard stop. For those, Asana is likely a better choice. 

Asana

Target audience: Teams operating concurrent deadlines, large enterprises, creating new products or services.

Asana may be the most full-featured of the tools we examined for managing projects, and potentially, large teams. If you don’t mind a steeper learning curve – or if you like the idea of automating routine tasks – Asana may be the tool for you and your colleagues.

Asana provides a free version of its Basic plan for up to 15 users. This tier lets you create tasks, assign them to team members and view them as a Kanban board (Trello and Monday also offer this sort of view). In the Basic, plan, you can also display all your deadlines a calendar. (Check out the complete plan comparison here.)

But many features, like the capability to view your project in a timeline, require a Premium plan, which costs $10.99 a month per user (each of Asanas plans is discounted if you pay annually). The Business plan adds priority support, and additional features, including the ability to see task dependencies, and a “workload” view that shows what everyone is working on – and potentially which employees are overloaded.

asana list view Asana

Asana can help you manage large projects, but most users will need a paid plan to see more than a simple list view, and access features like Gantt charts. 

To speed up routine tasks, Asana offers automation through its “Rules” feature. You can create your own rules based on triggers, like moving a task to a certain column as soon as it’s been marked complete, or use pre-designed ones from Asana.

You can add comments in projects, but there’s no built-in chat feature. That said, Asana offers excellent integrations for third-party collaboration software, for creating tasks assigning them, and adding or editing deadlines without leaving Slack, for example, or Microsoft Teams.

Asana offers a deep list of integrations for other tools as well, including G Suite and Microsoft Office. Asana also offers an app integration with Trello to sync up projects between them. Some of the integrations, like those for Salesforce and Adobe Creative Cloud, require a paid Business plan. 

Test drive before you decide

If your primary interest is in flexibility, and choosing how you want to work, Asana may be a good choice for your organization. It’s an excellent tool for managing sprawling projects with many moving parts. If you’re interested in simplicity (and need to watch costs) Trello is likely a better choice for you. And if spreadsheets seem a natural way to organize your project, Monday could be the right move. We recommend test-driving all three, for free, to see which approach best fits your team.



Source link

16 Tools for Keeping Your Remote Design Team Together (and on Task)

Before the COVID-19 outbreak, many small and large companies alike were already moving toward offering remote work. Now, with this pandemic forcing the global workforce to shutter themselves in their homes, there’s no more opportune time to get remote-workability to be a part of the contingency plan for your design team.

One of the biggest perks of a career in Web Design is the potential for working remotely. As long as you have access to Wi-Fi, you can basically work from anywhere, whether it be from home, a co-working space, or even the beach — the world is your proverbial remote oyster.

Whether you’re new to the telecommuting game or a seasoned veteran, working solo comes with its own set of challenges and roadblocks. Design work, in particular, is a collaborative process with project managers, designers, writers, clients, and other stakeholders — each with their own needs and priorities. Fortunately, there are tonnes of fantastic tools out there that help designers and other team members stay on the same page throughout the course of a project. Let’s break down some of the best tools out there and how they can improve collaboration amongst your remote team.

 

Project Management and Collaboration for Design-Focused Work

Design-focused teams have different requirements for their tools than general marketing teams with designers sprinkled in. Whether your design teams’ goal is to do a better job of tracking revisions, streamline project workflows, or get more control over file annotation and review, these collaboration tools for designers will have you covered.

Cage

Cage combines the project and task-level views familiar from broad project management tools and adds awesome features specifically for design teams. No matter the size, design teams will love the ability to annotate media files right in the software to make feedback and requests more specific and save time going back and forth with team members or clients. Another great feature for design teams is the advanced asset management that keeps every necessary file readily accessible for anyone who needs it.

cage

Visme

Visme makes creating easier. As a project management software with built-in media creation capabilities, it’s a unique offering for design teams looking to streamline workflows. Visme offers a variety of gorgeous templates for presentations, infographics, charts, web graphics, and more that give every stakeholder in the project a headstart on design work. It’s a perfect resource for teams who are working on a lot of projects simultaneously to keep assets organised.

visme

 

General Project Management and Collaboration Tools

Larger marketing teams with a wider variety of projects need more robust project management tools than design-only teams. Some features remain necessary, such as assigning tasks to certain project members, retaining documents, and even conversing directly with other teammates, but general project management software is unlikely to have robust features that shine for design teams.

Asana

You’ve heard of Asana, right? Almost everyone has. It’s one of the top work management tools on the market. With a variety of built-in ways to organise and visualise work, Asana keeps every person in a project on the same page. Depending on the size of your team, and how much functionality you want, Asana can run a bit on the expensive side. However, with the Business Plan, there are nearly unlimited ways to customise and automate your workflows to help the whole team reach peak efficiency.

asana

Basecamp

This year, Basecamp hit over 3 million account signups. It’s no wonder though, because Basecamp has everything a project needs to run smoothly — all in one place. Without ever leaving Basecamp, project teams can chat, check-in, organise files, schedule meetings or tasks, and generate to-do lists. Whether managing client projects, or internal projects, Basecamp is a great option for keeping everyone synced up.

basecamp

 

Meeting Tools, Virtual Offices, Communication Hubs

Though some project management platforms and other tools have communication capabilities built right in, teams that are working remotely often need a little extra help to stay in touch. Whether your team currently relies on email, instant messaging, phone calls, or virtual meetings, there’s a tool out there to make collaboration and communication easier.

Slack

Tired of trying to reach the elusive “Inbox Zero”? Slack’s here to help. The great thing about Slack is that teams can organise conversations into channels, and individuals only need to follow those conversations that are important to their work. When done well, Slack can help keep design teams collaborative, but also on task. Slack also integrates with an enormous number of apps that makes it a fantastic place to centralise all your team’s efforts.

slack

Twist

Twist offers a slightly different take on team chats than Slack. Less of an instant messaging service for distributed teams (although, it does that too), Twist combines the traditional structure of an email inbox with the topical, conversation threads of instant messaging.

One of the things we love about Twist is that it doesn’t show whether people are on- or off-line. This sounds daunting at first, and I’m sure you’re thinking, “But what if I need an immediate answer?” However, think of the remote work stress this small detail can alleviate from your team members. Less pressure to be constantly connected, taking more focused time out to dig deep on important projects, and getting back in the loop quickly and easily when needed.

twist

StormBoard

Ready to make your meetings truly collaborative? Stormboard is a digital workspace where teams can have meetings, discuss projects, and collaborate on specific tasks regardless of where they are in the world. This browser based tool combines the ideas of conference calls, collaborative whiteboards and project management into one easy-to-use tool. Collaborators can even edit the board under discussion in real time and display their ideas to the team, rather than trying to explain them without visualisation.

stormboard

 

Design Libraries & Document Organisation

A great design can take hours, days, weeks, even months to get right. Beyond the final asset, streamlined workflows, new templates, creative learnings, and more can come from the completion of one design project. Having a good design library ensures that an entire team can work collaboratively on the most recent version of important internal or external assets.

InVision

InVision’s motto is “Design better. Faster. Together.” and it offers lots of great tools built specifically to empower design teams. One of the best is the Design System Manager, which allows teams to centralise their design assets into one place as visuals as well as in code. As guidelines, assets, and images change over time, the advanced versioning system allows creative iteration without losing previous work and the capability to make notes to keep the entire team on the same page when changes are made.

invision

Abstract

Abstract integrates with tools designers already use like Sketch and Adobe XD, making it easy to import files that are already completed or in progress, but need more collaboration.

Combining the principles of project management and design libraries, Abstract allows collaborators to work from master files to iterate and create new designs without losing the original version, get feedback from other project members, and ultimately land on the best design. When designs are finalised and approved, they can be passed over to the developer without the guesswork, thanks to a Git-inspired workflow that saves time and frustration.

abstract

 

Collaborative Proofing and Editing Tools

For many teams, workflows aren’t simple. Whether you’re an in-house designer, agency, or freelance creative, a typical project will have multiple checkpoints and approvals before being finalised. Having the right proofing and editing tools that allow for pinpoint feedback and annotation create a faster, less hazardous road to project completion.

GoVisually

Whether you’re working as a creative freelancer, with an in-house design team, or as a collaborative agency, project delivery and approval can quickly become a cumbersome process. GoVisually streamlines this process with pinpoint annotations directly on designs to eliminate confusion and misunderstanding. Centralised feedback makes sure every project stakeholder stays up to date with the latest changes and revisions, allowing approvals to happen in real-time.

Bonus feature: it integrates with Slack to make communication and notification even faster.

govisually

RedPen

Version tracking? Check. Live annotations? Check. Unlimited collaborators? Check. Created by designers, for designers, RedPen knows what design teams need for maximum efficiency. With the click of a mouse, any project member can give feedback that easily turns into a collaborative discussion about the best next steps for each design. The best thing about RedPen is that it’s simple, effective, and impressively easy to use. You don’t even have to create an account to get started.

redpen

Figma

Figma takes everything you love about any design software you’ve ever used and mashes it all together in one responsive, interactive, collaborative tool. Teams can design and prototype with a single tool, with no coding required. Figma brings the intention of your designs to life, making it easy to test the effectiveness of your work before bringing in the development team. Collaboration has never been easier. Invite who you want, when you want, and project members can view or edit designs at the same time — all while never losing control over the version history of the task. If your design team is looking for more ways to work together while staying fast and focused, Figma is the best of the best.

figma

Bugherd

If you’re a web designer, or working on a team that’s responsible for a website, Bugherd is a must-have tool. The software acts as a layer on top of your website allowing project members (even those with minimal tech-savvy) to report bugs or issues without a long chain of back-and-forth emails. When an issue is identified, team members simply click on the element to report an issue to developers. With one click, developers can identify the pertinent what, where, and why of the bug and get down to solving the problem faster.

Bonus: it integrates with other apps you likely already use like Slack and Basecamp so your team can maintain their normal workflows, but with superpowers.

bugherd

 

Tools For Your Own Personal Sanity

I know from experience that remote work can be tough. With teams spread out all across the globe, it’s easy to feel isolated — there are a million distractions no matter where your “office” is. Luckily, as remote work becomes more common, so do tools that can help us stay focused, remain on task, and ultimately have a better work-from-anywhere experience.

Serene

Distractions abound, no matter where you’re working from. Serene lets you set predefined goals, helping you break your day into achievable sections. On top of helping you break down your big goals into smaller tasks, Serene helps remote workers focus by blocking distracting and wasting websites. The app will even play soothing music meant for focus, if that’s your thing.

serene

Figure It Out Chrome Extension

As a remote entrepreneur, I can’t count on two hands and both feet the number of times I’ve had to Google something like, “time difference from Zurich to California.” At least, until I found the Figure It Out Chrome Extension. Using the extension or the web-version I can input all my team members locations and see, at a glance, what time it is for them when we need to schedule a meeting or find time to collaborate.

figure-it-out

Take a Break, Please

Last but not least, remote work can be really hard to disconnect from. You start working on a task or project, and before you know it, four hours have gone by without a break. For your own sanity and personal health, it’s important to remember to get up, stretch, take a walk, something to get away from the screen for just a few minutes. This simple act can reduce task, project, or even job-level burnout. I recommend all remote workers download this app and take a break, please.

take-a-break

 

The Bottom Line on Remote Design Team Collaboration

Design is rarely a task that lives in a vacuum, and we need the knowledge, feedback, support, and sometimes approval of others — this all requires a collaborative effort.

No matter what type of team you work with, how big or how small, there is a tool (or a stack of tools) that will help improve workflows, productivity, and collaboration. Many of these tools offer free trials so that you can get a sense of the operational improvements, or roadblocks, adopting each software might introduce.

Give some of them a try and see how you can level up your remote design team’s collaboration with small additions that make a big impact during this trying time.



Source link

This $40 cloud training can help you master AWS, Azure, and more top tools

When innovations are developed, it almost always pays to be among the first with expert knowledge. That’s certainly been the case with cloud technologies so far, where skilled professionals can earn $98k per year. If this is an area of expertise you would like to explore but aren’t yet ready to commit to a lengthy and expensive post-secondary program, we’d recommend first getting your feet wet with The Complete 2020 Cloud Certification Bundle.

This economically priced bundle, valued at $3,800, provides students with a great introduction to cloud technologies. They’ll learn about major players like Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, discover the basics of building and deploying cloud-based infrastructures, and find out what makes the technology so advantageous as we move to a web-based world. And students will earn actual certificates upon completion too, so they could even use this training to find entry-level work.

What makes this particular program so enticing is the fact that students are able to direct their own studies. There are no actual classroom sessions to attend, so you won’t have to worry about fitting a tight learning schedule around work. And, you have a full year to complete all twelve courses. Plus there are no textbooks to purchase, making this training route even easier on the pocketbook.

It’s vitally important that information technology professionals keep their training on the cutting edge. But that doesn’t mean you have to put your life on hold and shell out big dollars on time-consuming post-secondary training. Instead, learn the 21st century way with The Complete 2020 Cloud Certification Training Bundle, currently offered to readers for just $39.99.

 

The Complete 2020 Cloud Certification Training Bundle – $39.99

See Deal

Prices are subject to change.

 

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.



Source link